hardi-plank siding replacement


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Old 03-24-10, 04:52 PM
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hardi-plank siding replacement


I need to replace one piece of Hardi-plank siding, as shown in this photo, the piece the hose faucet is sticking through. I need to fix it up so there isn't that missing square cut-out piece around the faucet, which means I want to replace that one particular length of the hardi-plank. How can I get the piece out, as it is of course nailed below the overlap of the piece above it? And, if I can manage to get it out from under, how can I again secure the replacement piece? Obviously I wouldn't be able to nail under the overlapping piece above.

Thanks for any advice/comments.
 
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Old 03-24-10, 06:04 PM
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First, take a grinder with a diamond blade (wear a n-95 dust mask or respirator) and score the piece you want to remove near the top (just under the lap) and snap it off. You will then be able to get a pry bar behind the siding. Pry it loose slightly. Don't worry if you break the underlying piece of siding that you cut off, you want to bust it out anyway. After you get a little bit of space, take your pry bar and try to break whatever siding is underneath there off of the nails by driving it upward a little. It should break fairly easily at each nail. Pull the pieces out, don't drive them way up behind the siding you want to leave. Once all those pieces are broken off and removed, you can clip the nails with a pair of side cutter pliers or get the nice Malco tool they make for this purpose.

You will obviously have to face nail the piece that you replace, and perhaps the one above it too.
 
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Old 03-24-10, 09:22 PM
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Thanks very much XSleeper for those instructions. The expensive Malco tool looks great but will probably have to do it without that unless maybe I can borrow one from somewhere.
 
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Old 03-25-10, 05:19 AM
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Keep in mind there's nothing wrong with the way you blocked out the siding. You could leave the siding the way it is and make a mounting block for the spigot out of some other material. (cedar, PVC, composite, etc) Disconnecting the spigot, installing the mounting block, (or replacing the siding) then reconnecting the spigot is the best way to make a clean installation.
 
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Old 03-25-10, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
Keep in mind there's nothing wrong with the way you blocked out the siding. You could leave the siding the way it is and make a mounting block for the spigot out of some other material. (cedar, PVC, composite, etc) Disconnecting the spigot, installing the mounting block, (or replacing the siding) then reconnecting the spigot is the best way to make a clean installation.
Actually it was not me but someone else in the past who had cut the square out of the siding around the spigot like that. Perhaps it was that person's intent to install a mounting block as you mention, but for whatever reason it didn't work out and was just left as is, which of course is unfinished and unsightly. Also I noticed the spigot doesn't seem to be installed out far enough; its flange is solidly flush with the plywood instead of the siding and there's no "give" to pull it out a little if you needed to.
I do like your idea of making a mounting a block instead of going to the trouble of replacing that piece of siding, I hadn't thought of that. I've seen what you're talking about before and it would be fine here.
Also, removing the spigot (hose bib) is primarily the reason I'm considering how to finish out around it, because two or three inches back within the wall on its stem there's a leak occuring at a copper union soldered joint. I'll have to be accessing from the inside of the wall to remove and repair (will probably just replace) the old hose bib with its leaky stem.
Your mention of perhaps using pvc or composite material for the mounting block interests me. Can you give an example of a particular product I might look for to do it that way? thanks!
 
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Old 03-25-10, 03:13 PM
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Azek is a PVC material (there are other brands as well) that comes in dimensional lumber sizes, like 1x6... 1x8, etc. It's nice because it won't rot, and is pretty much indestructible unless you put a match to it.

As for composite, there are any number of decking materials that are 4/4 or 5/4 thick, but most all of them are 5 1/2" wide which might not be wide enough for what you would need. Many deck systems use composite materials, for the floor or also for skirt boards. I used some that was 1/2" thick x 12" a while back, but forget who made it. At any rate, those are the materials I was suggesting just because they are impervious to rot.

You can also get cement trim, but it's a real pain in the u know what to cut and drill. There are various kinds of LP trim (man-made wood products) that would also be fine. The materials used really aren't critical, except for the fact that a spigot is something you don't want to connect and disconnect very often since it can be a big deal, esp if the inside access to it is finished!
 
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Old 03-25-10, 05:13 PM
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Okay thanks again for the info. I might ask around and see if any contractors or somebody else around here might have a chunk of that Azek or composite deck material left over I can have (I only need a piece 5 1/4" square). Would probably be most ideal to use something that would never rot; otherwise I'll use a piece of cedar primed and painted really good, would probably last long "enough" without starting to deteriorate.
 
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Old 03-25-10, 07:47 PM
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Yeah, if you end up using wood, paint it front and back (on all 6 sides), you'll be surprised how that helps the paint hold up to the elements. And when you shove the new spigot in, caulk the space around the spigot so that it's sealed as well. Good luck dumpster diving!
 
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Old 04-03-10, 08:00 AM
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Go to a lumber yard that sells Azek decking (or some other composite) and ask them for a SAMPLE of decking. They should be able to give you one large enough for what you are doing. Forget the big box stores -- their "samples" are mostly connected to a display. But I have literally HUNDREDS of samples that local lumber yards have given me (a deck contractor) over the years. They also hand them out freely to retail customers like you.
 
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Old 04-03-10, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by lefty View Post
Go to a lumber yard that sells Azek decking (or some other composite) and ask them for a SAMPLE of decking.
Dangit lefty I already used a chunk of cedar board because it ended up seeming like too much trouble to ask around looking for a little chunk of Azek or composite which I didn't have. Like you say I'll bet if I would've just asked for a sample at the local lumber yard it would have been just the ticket to score a perfect piece of material for this little fixup job. The cedar turned out fine but I wish I'd had your cool suggestion a week ago when I was working on it. Oh well, maybe "next time."
 
 

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