Repairing Stucco exterior siding

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Old 04-05-11, 01:03 PM
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Repairing Stucco exterior siding

I have a Tudor home built in 1979. The exterior stucco is showing cracks in it. As I look at the siding it is not cement but a 4' x 8' fiber board that has stucco effect in the board. The board has been painted over. In some places the board is coming apart and needs to be replaced. Any ideas on what this board is or where I can get it?
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Old 04-05-11, 01:10 PM
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Most likly James Haree panels. It's hard to find unless your willing to order a full pallet load of it. Start calling around to real siding supplyers in your area.
If you contact James Hardee direct they will send you a sample to see if it matches up.
If it's falling apart it's because it was installed wrong in the first place. You can down load the install dirrections on there web site.
If it was installed with in 4" of any soild surface that will bounce water back up on it like a roof, deck, driveway, ECT it will fail, If no one prepainted the edges or expecily cut edges it's going to fall apart. If someone set the nails more then flush it cracks the panels.
 
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Old 04-05-11, 01:37 PM
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It's been awhile but I've painted a bunch of that type of masonite panels. They should be primed with an exterior oil base primer - that helps to seal out moisture and make the panel last longer.

I don't know the extent of your damage but I have repaired this type of siding with Durhams Rock Hard Putty. Basically you remove the bad, prime the substrate and then apply the rock hard. It's best to oil prime the repair before painting. I don't know how long this type of repair lasts although I've never had a customer to call back and complain.

Joe makes a good point about filling and sealing any nails that have been drove in too far!..... and I've never understood why any builder would use these types of products close to the ground
 
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Old 04-05-11, 07:40 PM
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cmj0423,

Welcome to the forums.

WHAT IS IT??

Joecaption is talking about Hardie panels. Certainly a possibility. Marksr is talking about Masonite panels with a textured surface. Could be that as well. Any way to determine just what it is? (Hardie is about 1/2" thick -- Masonite is only about 1/4" thick.)

Hardie has a VERY long warranty on their product -- but that only covers defects in the material. If it wan't installed per Hardie, you're gonna be on your own. Masonite's warranty on material defects is long gone.
 
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Old 04-06-11, 05:23 AM
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"Masonite is only about 1/4" thick"

Are you sure? Back in the 70's and early 80's I painted new homes that had that type of siding and was always told it was masonite - it was 1/2" thick [give or take a tad]
 
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Old 04-06-11, 10:32 AM
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Thank you Joe, I will look for James Hardee & download the instructions. It was installed right to the driveway and the edges do not appear to have been painted, figures (oh well). Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 04-06-11, 10:35 AM
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Thanks Mark, there appears to be a big section that is like mush. As you touch the panel it keeps falling apart. I have not been ready to replace it so I have not seen how large it is coming apart. A Roheden bush was planted right next to it. The branches had been covering the side. There are 1x4 pine that was painted to seal the seams but most are turning into mush also & needs to be replaced. That is the easy part. Figuring how to get a panel or two is the hard part. These panels seem to be 1/2" thick. Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 04-06-11, 03:25 PM
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Masonite, and it's thickness may well be a left coast vs. right coast thing. All that has been readily available on the left coast is either 1/8" or 1/4" thick. It was used in the mid-50's into the early-60's as a siding, then it's use just kinda died off.
 
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Old 04-13-11, 09:18 AM
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I am located just south of Boston Massachusetts. I think we are about as opposite of each other as we can be. Thank you for the advice, I greatly appreciate it.
 
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Old 04-13-11, 04:57 PM
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Built in '79, obviously not James Hardie or fiber cement. It's definately masonite siding, with a stucco finish, called Staccato. It was still available (special order) a few years back, I had to do some repairs on a tudor from the same era, also built in the 70's. The old siding was about 5/8" thick as I recall. And yeah, it turns to mush.
 
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Old 04-16-11, 07:54 AM
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Yes, I do not believe it is fiber cement. I think you have it! I will search for Staccato siding. Thank you for your help.
 
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