Cedar Siding Peeling Paint Repair Issues HELP!

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Old 04-07-11, 10:04 AM
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Cedar Siding Peeling Paint Repair Issues HELP!

I am working on the peeling paint on my cedar bevel siding. We replaced some rotten boards, pressure washed the peeling paint off, then painted using a sprayer and paint and primer in one. There is still peeling paint and prominent lines on the wood where the old paint didnt come off. It doesnt look good (it kind of looks like we just painted over the peeling paint).
I worked on a little section scraping the still peeling paint and sanding any lines and it looks pretty good after i put a couple new coats on. I'm just curious if there is anything else i could do to fix this? Sanding this little section took a very long time and two sheets of sandpaper. I just dont know if i can do this on the entire house. Please help!
 
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Old 04-07-11, 10:25 AM
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Welcome to the forums

I have not used one (and will not, as will become clear as I say more...) but the concept of a paint and primer all in one does not make sense to me - they have different jobs and I think combining them in one product would cause neither to work as well as they should

You have also discovered paint tends to make flaws more visible, not less so

You need to remove all of the loose paint and, as you discovered, may need to sand the edges smooth

I would roll on an oil based primer and the top with a couple coats of quality latex paint
 
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Old 04-07-11, 03:27 PM
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First off you should never use a pressure washer to peel the paint off of siding. A PWer is a great tool for prepping a house for paint but it can and will damage the siding when either too much pressure is used or the tip is held too close to the wood.

A pull scraper works best for removing peeling paint, a putty knife can be helpful for anything the scraper misses. The edge where raw wood and old paint meet will always show unless it's sanded. Generally the edges are left as is unless the customer wants to pay extra for sanding.

When ever wood siding is sprayed, it should be back brushed [or rolled] This helps to work the paint into the wood better resulting in a nicer looking job that should last longer.
 
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Old 04-07-11, 06:29 PM
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A power washer can also drive water behind the siding, and even though the surface of the siding may seem dry enough to paint, if the back side of the siding is wet (or has a high moisture content) then your paint job is likely to fail as a result.
 
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Old 04-07-11, 06:35 PM
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Make sure that paint isn't lead based before you start sanding it.
 
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Old 04-07-11, 08:36 PM
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Sanding this little section took a very long time and two sheets of sandpaper. I just dont know if i can do this on the entire house. Please help!
Yes there is but it is ridiculously expensive. There is product that you glop on with a drywall knife and then place paper over it. Come back in a day, peel the paper, and most of the paint is gone. Google something like "Peel Away" for more info.

I had the same problem 10 years ago, but my siding was not in good enough shape. I put all new siding up, primed it and then instead of painting , I used deck stain. It is still going strong and I hopefully will not have to sand to much the next time around. You might want to consider it, if you have the whole house sanded.
 
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Old 04-08-11, 06:05 PM
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Cedar should never had been painted in the first place, only stain should have been used. Soild color stain can be mixed any color that paint can be mixed.
Cedar is a very oily wood so paint sort of floats on the surface and does not soak into the wood like stain will.
 
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Old 04-08-11, 07:43 PM
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