Vinyl Siding Fasteners?

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-13-11, 01:03 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 125
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Vinyl Siding Fasteners?

I have about 700sq. ft. of siding and 120 linear ft. of soffits to install. Considering it's not so much real estate, and my time is "free", I was leaning towards screw fasteners. Added benefit would be ease of assuring proper fastener clearance. If going this route I would choose #8 - 1 1/4" pan/truss. My questions would be zinc or stainless and whether there is any practical difference between pan and truss? Also, any compelling reasons to go with galvanized nails instead of screws?

Cheers!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-13-11, 01:29 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 21,545
Received 311 Votes on 285 Posts
I often use screws in soffits or on the tail ends of furring strips if they are not well supported. There is nothing more frustrating than trying to drive a nail into a board that springs back. I would go with a truss head which has a lower profile and wider head than a pan head. Eventually, even though they are protected from the weather the zinc plated hardware will rust. If you are close to the coast with salt spray in the air I would go for stainless if you can afford them but if you are further inland I'd go with zinc plated.

Nails generally go in faster and are less expensive then screws and a hammer is a less expensive tool than a quality screw gun or cordless drill. That's the only benefit to nails that I know of. I've had them slowly work their way out of old houses after many freeze thaw cycles and changing humidity make the wood expand and contract. When I go back and repair I use screws and have never had one come loose.
 
  #3  
Old 05-14-11, 04:17 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
Just to add to Dane's comments, don't overtighten any fastener in the siding process as it has to expand and contract with the weather. You can tell a bad job driving down the street with ripples in it, you know the fasteners were too tight. And if you can find coated screws (mostly used for decking) use them, as the coating will outlast zinc or galvanization. But nothing will beat stainless.
 
  #4  
Old 05-14-11, 05:21 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 125
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Much appreciate the great replies guys, practical hands-on info I was looking for!

Looks like Bolt Depot has 1000ct #8 1-1/4" truss 18-8 stainless for an extremely reasonable $65. One box is likely to fill my needs.

Cheers!
 
  #5  
Old 05-14-11, 08:37 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,867
Received 298 Votes on 271 Posts
1000 fasteners, if placed every 16" along a 12' piece of siding, would do approximately 100 pieces of siding. That would be about 4 boxes, or 8 squares. (800 sq ft - or a wall 8' high, 100' long.)

So your 1000 ct box might be enough as long as you don't drop any.
 
  #6  
Old 05-16-11, 08:03 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 125
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
So your 1000 ct box might be enough as long as you don't drop any.
Thanks for the additional info!

You spurred me to running the numbers again and it looks like I had better keep the grass cut short. 67pc of double 5" should require at max 600 screws, add in trim and soffits and 1000ct is likely a squeaker.



One additional question -- What style stagger for panel overlaps tends to look better, 2' stair-stepped, totally random (i.e. wood flooring) or, something else?

Cheers!
 
  #7  
Old 05-16-11, 09:30 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,867
Received 298 Votes on 271 Posts
I like to keep the stagger no less than 32". But it depends on the length of the wall and the amount of waste it might create. We discussed that recently in this other thread.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/lu...yl-siding.html
 
  #8  
Old 05-17-11, 10:46 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 125
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
I like to keep the stagger no less than 32". ... We discussed that recently in this other thread.
Nail on the head AGAIN! The reply you posted in that link makes perfect sense. It also reminds me that cuts should be on stud (hence 32", not 24") and after taking a second look at my two neighbors vinyl it's clear they overlapped at 16" intervals which emphasized the stair-step look. They also overlapped towards the focal point making for a very visible seam.

I should apologize, asked my question in haste before doing a proper search.

Cheers!
 
  #9  
Old 05-17-11, 03:10 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,867
Received 298 Votes on 271 Posts
Originally Posted by golem View Post
They also overlapped towards the focal point making for a very visible seam.
That's something I didn't mention but it's good you noticed that! Lapping siding so that the shadow lines are hidden from the most visible spots (driveway / street / main approaches / decks, etc) is a detail that some people wouldn't notice... but if you do notice it, it would drive you nuts!

Overlapping joints don't necessarily have to be on studs, but your nailing pattern often will be.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: