Vinyl cladding over existing wood trim?

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Old 07-12-11, 10:53 AM
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Vinyl cladding over existing wood trim?

So, the company that installed my new windows a coulpe of years ago called to see if I needed and siding or other work done. As it happens, I do.

I live in a 4-story townhouse, with a large dormer on the front and one on the rear of the 4th floor (master bedroom). The fascia boards and trim around the windows are all starting to peel paint and possibly slightly rot (I have checked around the windows some and all of the wood seems solid, just wet looking in areas of paint peel). This is not something I can easily do myself as it is 35 feet off the ground (straight up in the front!), but they said they could do it and came out last Saturday to give me an estimate.

What they plan on doing is wrapping the existing wood trim and fascia boards in vinyl. I have no experience or knowledge of how this is done. I have done some searching on the internet, but most of the hits seem to be for installing vinyl siding over wood siding, which I think would be slightly different.

Anyway, what are some pros and cons of doing this? Any questions I should ask during the estimate/before deciding on someone? I plan to get at least 2 more contractors out for estimates, but the 1st price wasn't bad (not as bad as I thought it was going to be...).

Any experience/guidance is appreciated.

Thank You,
Neil
 
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Old 07-12-11, 11:10 AM
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If the wood is rotting, I would replace it, not cover it up.
 
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Old 07-12-11, 11:26 AM
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The wood isn't rotting anywhere I can see, but I have no roof access to rally poke around all of the trim. Just looked like in one place the paint was peeled and the corner of the trim slightly chipped (like something had hit it). The wood was wet, but if I recall correctly, it had rained recently so that may be why. I am definitely going to ask that they replace any rotted or unsound wood trim that they encounter. Otherwise, the vinyl cladding wouldn't have a good foundation to adhere to properly.

Thanks,
Neil
 
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Old 07-12-11, 11:32 AM
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I have had contractors tell me that as long as they can find enough good wood to nail to...they won't replace wood. To me thats just insane. At the minimum rot should be removed and filled with something. If its not and there is any dampness inside, it will just continue rotting. I had customers that brought me in pieces of aluminum coil (what they wrap trim with) with soft rotten wood still inside and asked if I could match the profile.

If trim wrap is done absolutely correctly and caulking maintenance is done religiously...I guess it's ok....but I'd rather just use materials that won't rot.
 
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Old 07-12-11, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post

If trim wrap is done absolutely correctly and caulking maintenance is done religiously...I guess it's ok....but I'd rather just use materials that won't rot.
He said they would be using "lifetime" caulk, lol. I haven't seen such a thing, but I guess no matter how the trim is repaired (either vinyl wrapped or replaced with rot-free material), I will probably need to re-caulk at some time, which will still be an issue given lack of access.

When you speak of materials that won't rot, I assume you are talking about composite board or something (Azek, Tufboard, etc.)? I guess that would be more expensive, but better in the long run?

Some concerns I have with anything being done (either vinyl wrapped or composite board installed) is a) boards will need painting, can't have white trim as it isn't original to the house (HOA rules have to replace in kind), and b) if it isn't installed properly (either material), rot won't be evident until it is way too late since it would all be rotting under the surface if caulking has failed, wasn't done completely, etc. Not an easy place to inspect annually for caulk failure and re-do if necessary.....

Why did I buy a 4-story townhouse.....

-Neil
 
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Old 07-12-11, 12:13 PM
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No caulk lasts forever but I've heard the lifetime stuff does last the longest
 
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Old 07-12-11, 12:29 PM
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You touched on exactly all my thoughts.
 
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Old 07-13-11, 04:05 AM
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Wrapping the wood

What the salesman is referring to is called capping - wrapping and it is done with PVC coil trim, they take the measurements of the wood, and in a metal brake they bend the metal to fit the wood being wrapped.

Now for the rotted wood......... I personally will not cover any rotted wood. Once rotted you are covering it up and it will continue to do so.

Always replace rotted wood when capping it.

Caulking - Lifetime ? No - Quad Caulk is the best and its rated 30 years

Here is a video of wrapping with aluminum coil.
http://youtu.be/n-Oh9cBJgqw
 
 

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