Patching T1-11 siding

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Old 08-28-11, 10:55 AM
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Patching T1-11 siding

I have a 28x40 pole barn with T1-11 that's going on 20 years old. I have roughly 20-30 spots where the T1-11 needs patched due to the top layer coming off. I did fill some of the patches years ago with Bondo and used the same solid stain (Sherwin Williams) over it. They held for a few years but are falling out and need fixed, along with some new ones.

Can someone recommend what I can do for this? I've heard good things about PC Woody wood epoxy paste, though, it's a little pricey and I have to have it shipped from Home Depot. I don't mind paying if it's going to do the job and not need reapplied in the next 10 years.

Thanks in advance for any help.
 
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Old 08-28-11, 02:18 PM
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How did your 'bondo patch' look?
I don't see any type of patch job looking very good and because the T-111 is coming apart, I doubt any patch will hold up long term. IMO you would be better off replacing the siding. I've not heard of the PC Woody paste. I've used Durham's Rock Hard Putty with some success repairing siding.

Unless I'm mistaken all T-111 manufactures state you must use primer and paint for their warranty to be valid. While stain looks nice on T-111, it doesn't sufficiently seal the plywood. 1 coat of oil primer followed by 2 coats of a quality latex house paint gives the best protection.
 
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Old 11-30-11, 07:43 PM
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Agree with the last post. Once the outer layer starts coming apart/peeling/splitting it means it's pretty far gone and may continue to deteriorate. 20 years is a long time, especially if it hasn't been maintained properly with paint. Before attempting any major patching I would go around the sheets, especially at bottom edges, under gable ends, in shady spots, and around windows, poking with a screwdriver to check for soft rot, which if it's there will probably mean you want to replace the siding. Once the sheets start getting soft/rotten you'll also have problems with the framing members underneath because they're also probably staying wet and will rot too - and they're structural.

I agree that patching the loose spots won't look too great (I've tried it), mostly because the siding has a rough surface but the patches will be smooth. Assuming you do want to patch , a product that when applied over CPES seems to hold up much better than Bondo (I've tried both) is Smith's Fill-It Epoxy. Both are expensive though.

Before thinking patching is easier than replacing, consider that you may have to sand the patches.

If you do replace the T1-11, paint both sides!
 
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Old 12-01-11, 10:08 AM
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Unless I'm mistaken all T-111 manufactures state you must use primer and paint for their warranty to be valid. While stain looks nice on T-111, it doesn't sufficiently seal the plywood.

I don't know about a warranty, never asked, but all I've ever used on my T1-11 is Ace Solid Color Oil Stain. Built the garage 22 years ago last July and it still looks good. I'd guess the two foot overhang on the 40' side and one foot on the 26' side helps some.


1 coat of oil primer followed by 2 coats of a quality latex house paint gives the best protection.

I hate, hate, HATE painting....that's why I went with stain. Get a deep nap roller with a long handle and slop it on. Going back and doing all the groves is a bit of a pain though.
 
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Old 12-01-11, 10:15 AM
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I'm not sure if I've ever rolled an oil base stain on T-111 but with paint/primer - use a big nap like you said and slop it on. The paint will slide into all the grooves and then before it sets up, back roll with the now slightly dry roller to even it all out. I rarely ever have the need to use a brush on the grooves.
 
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Old 12-01-11, 11:11 AM
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I didn't know this till just now, there are two different types of T1-11....plywood and OSB.


T1-11 Siding | Plywood Siding | OSB Siding

Other Considerations. The other down side of OSB T1-11 is that you can't stain this siding—it must be primed and painted




Mine is the plywood version and the grooves are pretty deep. Unless you filled a fire truck with paint and blasted it on I don't think the grooves would get filled in at all.


Are we talking about the same thing?
 
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Old 12-01-11, 04:30 PM
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Ya, I've painted miles of the OSB version. It does ok if it's oil primed and then painted with latex. I think they came up with it replace the masonite 4x8 siding after everyone had their fill

The original type of T-111 can be primed and painted with a roller [with no brush for the grooves] but you can't be stingy with the paint. Basically you slop it on and let it run into all the grooves and fill the grain, then as it starts to set up you take a halfway dry roller and roll over it knocking out all the runs. I usually use a 1" nap for rolling T-111 ..... no matter what type Same thing for the old RB&B siding.
 
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Old 12-01-11, 05:44 PM
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A 1" nap would make a huge difference, all I can find at the local Ace is 5/8 or 3/4.

I just stained this year but I'll remember that for the next time.

Thanks for the tip.
 
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Old 12-01-11, 06:34 PM
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Check out Consumer Reports shingle, deck, and fence stain tests and ratings. I haven't looked in awhile but transparent stains usually rate pretty bad for durability and wood protection and even the solid kind of stain doesn't do too well compared to a really good paint.

When it comes to things that take a lot of time like painting I pay zero attention to what manufacturers claim their products can do unless I can find a serious review that confirms it.

Plywood won't last long if it gets wet and that's even more true for OSB. Primer and paint is the way to go.
 
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Old 12-02-11, 06:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Baldwin View Post
A 1" nap would make a huge difference, all I can find at the local Ace is 5/8 or 3/4.
You may have to go to a real paint store to find the bigger nap. Oddly, I don't think I've ever seen a 5/8" nap. Applying most any coating the way I described, takes more paint/stain but the upside is the more coating you apply, the longer the paint job should last
 
 

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