Sealing & Siding Project, #3

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Old 10-04-11, 04:48 PM
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Sealing & Siding Project, #3

Moving on around the patio, finally, and this is what I found...

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similar to the other side of the door. It's actually not as bad as I expected, but now I have 40 feet to go...

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Here is what I did before using roll flashing and OSI Quad around the bottom.

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Should I cut off the bottom 4-6 inches and replace with new material or just make sure to nail all the way through to the bottom plate to anchor the vinyl starter strip? I figure the flashing will provide a flat enough surface for the new siding.
 
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Old 10-04-11, 05:56 PM
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If it was my house I would probably cut out 3 or 4" and replace. But I would keep it up above the cement by about 3/4", just to make sure it doesn't wick water again in the future. Hopefully your flashing will keep water out when you caulk against the cement and push the flashing down into the sealant.
 
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Old 10-05-11, 11:45 PM
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Here's another opinion--if it were mine, I'd run a horizontal sawcut, rip out and replace a 3 or 4 inch strip of rotted OSB with Hardiplank or something similar. Caulk the seam between the new filler pieces and OSB. Then put your vinyl over that, and simply caulk the bottoms with a good butyl caulk. Save the flashing for when you really need it.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 06:13 AM
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Good idea, but fiber cement siding is not impervious to water. Hardie's instructions recommend that their siding be kept 2" above any roof, cement sidewalk, patio or steps.

If you wanted to use that same idea though, Azek pvc trim would be a better product to use since it will never rot. It is available in 1/2" sheets, although they will cost you a small fortune compared to your osb, flashing and caulk.
 
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Old 10-08-11, 09:45 AM
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I kinda like the pvc idea and will be calling the box stores to see what they might have on the shelf today. Meanwhile, anyone know how the thermal expansion of the pvc vs. aluminum flashing vs.concrete might compare? This is a direct west facing wall and will get full on summer sun. Where the siding has slots to accommodate expansion, the caulk seal will have to flex. How much risk is there that the caulk seal to the concrete will fail due to expansion? I originally chose the aluminum for cost and ease of use, but I think steel flashing actually expands less and might have been a better choice for this purpose.
 
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Old 10-08-11, 12:15 PM
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If you nail the PVC to the wall, as many people like to do, using 8d finish nails, its likely the entire piece will move lengthwise, making joints open and close with the seasons. But if you screw the piece to the wall, the screws help limit the lateral "growth" of the board, instead it forces it to bow out just slightly between each pair of screws as it tries to expand laterally. That's been my experience anyway.

As far as your sealant is concerned, I'd be using a polyurethane sealant like Sonneborn NP1 that is also used for expansion joints. It will bond best to the concrete and also have good expansion and contraction properties that allow for seasonal changes. Nothing will hold well if your cement pad is rising and falling with frost heaving it.

I know Menards carries Certainteed pvc, and Lowes have some other brand. It's usually about $6 bd/ft. Any pvc skirt you use would then need to be capped with a drip cap, and you usually would want to maintain a little clearance between the drip cap and the siding. If you like the idea of using a pvc skirt, you could plan the width of your skirt so that you could for instance, apply a 1x4 skirt and drip cap, then a 1/2" gap for drainage, then a starter strip, then your siding would start with a full piece instead of a rip that is inside a finish trim or utility J. Or maybe you'd buy a 1x10 and rip it in half so that it's closer to 4 1/2" or something, depending on the height you wanted to start the siding at.
 
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