replacing sheathing behind brick veneer

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-10-11, 11:23 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
replacing sheathing behind brick veneer

Hi folks,

Improper flashing has caused water damage to the sheathing behind a brick veneer. I opened up the wall between the corner post and the first two adjacent studs. Insulation was soaked and moldy. I removed that to find sheathing with the consistency of wet cardboard. I removed that to see moldy tar paper which I also removed. Now from the inside of my house I can see the back of the brick veneer.

How would I slide new sheathing back into the space between the brick veneer and studs, re-attach the sheathing to the studs and somehow get a new moisture barrier attached to the sheathing and also sealed to the adjacent tar paper?

I can't imagine how such a thing could be done so I thought I would try here first. Thanks!

Mike
 
  #2  
Old 11-11-11, 04:20 PM
E
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,051
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I hope I am wrong but I see a brick veneer tearout and re-brick being required in that area and hopefully it is an isolated area. Remember also that your bricks are also tied into the sheathing with metal ties where it is attached to the wall studs. How many linear feet are you talking about? How far did the moisture wick in the adjacent wood structure? What about the bottom of the studs and the sill plate? Has this been going on long enough to cause wood rot elsewhere. I am not an expert but this looks to me like it is going to be a fairly extensive amount of work required to correct it all properly and to get all and any mould that has now formed cleaned also.
 
  #3  
Old 11-11-11, 04:58 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Equinox. Thanks for your reply!

Originally Posted by equinox View Post
I hope I am wrong but I see a brick veneer tearout and re-brick being required in that area and hopefully it is an isolated area.
Uh-oh!

Originally Posted by equinox View Post
Remember also that your bricks are also tied into the sheathing with metal ties where it is attached to the wall studs.
I haven't looked up the wall far enough to examine the brick tie into the sheathing. I was hoping the ties go directly through the sheathing into the studs so even if a fair amount of sheathing was rotten and needed to be replaced the brick ties into the studs would still be intact. Is this hoping for too much?


Originally Posted by equinox View Post
How many linear feet are you talking about? How far did the moisture wick in the adjacent wood structure? What about the bottom of the studs and the sill plate? Has this been going on long enough to cause wood rot elsewhere. I am not an expert but this looks to me like it is going to be a fairly extensive amount of work required to correct it all properly and to get all and any mold that has now formed cleaned also.
So the property was built in 2001 and it looks like the lack of flashing was an original design flaw. The leak could have been ongoing for 10 years as a worst case scenario. the picture below shows the source of the leak:



Had someone come by and put ice shield in place to temporarily prevent additional water damage until flashing can be properly installed. Bless him!

The picture below is the first exploratory wall opening and baseboard removal:



The picture below is after opening up wall further and removing wet moldy insulation. The sheathing is completely black as compared to the sheathing to the left.




The initial investigation suggests the damage may be contained between the corner post and the stud to the immediate left. I only went up 3 ft but imagine the damage goes all the way up to the ceiling (maybe 8 or 9ft) The sheathing to the left stud cavity looks nice except for a small portion in the lower right corner. The study cavity to the right is another story. The sheathing had the consistency of wet cardboard so I removed all of it, along with the wet/moldy insulation and tar paper from the area I have exposed.

Below is a better view of the bottom plate and lower portion of studs after exposing the brick:



The bottom plate looks damaged along with the bottom of the corner post and adjacent stud. This is a load bearing exterior 6ft wall that runs parallel to the ceiling and floor joists. I'm looking into methods of supporting the wall while the damaged portion of the studs and bottom plate are replaced.

Tonight I will open up the wall to the right of the corner to see how far the damage extends.

Do not know the condition of the sill plate but here is a picture of the corner from the basement looking up:



The following picture shows a glimpse of the sill plate and it doesn't look to bad but the lower portion of the engineered I-beam web looks bowed out.




Finally, I would like to evaluate solutions short of tearing down the and rebuilding the brick veneer. For example, if such a suboptimal solution exists, what is the downside.
 

Last edited by mmbridges; 11-11-11 at 05:32 PM.
  #4  
Old 11-12-11, 05:25 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,823
Received 359 Votes on 316 Posts
I don't know how kosher it would be but you could use some foam board instead of plywood [assuming the damage is limited to one stud bay] That would protect the new insulation from moisture although the exterior side of the studs would still be without protection

In the pics it looks like there is still a fair amount of moisture present. You'd want to make sure everything is dry [and will stay that way] before you close it back up.
 
  #5  
Old 11-07-13, 10:14 PM
M
Member
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Status?

Just wondering how you fixed the problem? We just ran into pretty much same situation today in the new home we purchased....surprise! I now hate surprises!
 
  #6  
Old 11-08-13, 04:46 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,823
Received 359 Votes on 316 Posts
Welcome to the forums MrsH!

mmbridges hasn't been active on the forums for almost a year and this thread is over 5 yrs old BUT if you have any specific questions we'll try to help. Pics might be helpful - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
  #7  
Old 11-08-13, 07:26 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I ended up opening up the wall all the way up to the ceiling and in the room above. Water damade to floor and ceiling manufactured I-beams along with top and bottom plates. Ended up getting a contractor who created a completely new stud bay with top plate bottom plate and sheathing section from floor to ceiling. They constructed it in the room and attached tar paper on the back and wrapped it around the edges. They placed additional tar paper on the cleaned up and trimmed sheathing that was on each side of the area where the new stud bay would be. This was accessible at that point because the water damaged and moldy sheathing was completely removed in the stud bay that was to be replaced and one could reach your hand back between the brick and good sheathing fairly easily i order to attach the additional tar paper. They then slid the new assembly into place sister'd it against remaining studs and sealed the joint from the inside. The new assembly was not tied into the brick as there was no way to do that with this method. The contractor assessed, and I concurred, that the remaining brick ties on either side of the replaced stud bay were sufficient.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: