installing vinyl, walls uneven across front of house

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Old 02-28-12, 04:47 PM
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installing vinyl, walls uneven across front of house

Hey guys,

Another issue I have run into with my siding project on my ranch. One of the previous owners had walled in the breezeway between the original house and the garage creating another room. Problem is the wall that was built in the front sits proud of the rest of the house. And it was also not built plumb so it sticks out maybe an 1/8" on the top by the soffits and about an 1.5" on the bottom. I thought to taper it with plywood but not sure how to handle once it reaches the living room window on the right which is only 2 feet away and also the garage door frame on the left which is 1 foot away. How would you guys handle this?

see pics below.

Levinson Interactive

thanks,

Mark





 
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Old 02-28-12, 06:27 PM
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Wow, that is a real headscratcher. One side is plumb and one side isn't. I guess the question would be, on the side that isn't plumb... is it plumb once you get to the door edge? Or if you use a long straightedge, does the side that sticks out the farthest plane into the other side eventually? That might affect how I'd answer. But in the meantime...

There is probably no good way to make it disappear without causing a problem somewhere else. To keep it simple,you could cover that vertical transition with a piece of trim, like a 1x4, and j-channel the left side of the 1x4 and j-channel the right side of the 1x4. The j-channel would accept the siding on both sides, and you would have to live with the taper where the j-channel meets the side of the 1x4. The siding on one side would just be indented.

If you try and plane the wall out (which is what you were considering), it will build out the wall alright, but it would create the same sort of taper on the side of your trim. I'm not sure which is the lesser of two evils in this case.

I suppose the best thing to do would be to tear out the garage door jamb, try and plane the walls together by adding a combination of shims and plywood, then make a new tapered jamb for the garage door so that the brickmould around the garage door would still protrude past the new sheathing level by the standard amount. You'd basically be transferring the taper to the garage door jamb where it would be the least noticeable.
 
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Old 02-29-12, 03:38 AM
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Why do people do this? Plumb and square. That's all they need to know.
I agree with Brant, on the proud part, rip a 1x to fit flat on the bump out tapering it as necessary to fit. Put a 1x4 on the flat part to dress up the edge of the other 1x. Install j channel on the two pieces to accept the siding. You will still have the bump out, but I think it would be less noticeable from a front on view. From your pix it appears this takes place on both sides of the breezeway, right? At least it would look symmetrical if you did both sides alike. I doubt you can make it disappear completely without doing a lot of jamb extensions and resetting of doors/windows.
 
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Old 02-29-12, 08:01 AM
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Thank you guys for the thoughtful advice. Those solutions would definitely be workable but I had been hoping to achieve something that would avoid calling attention to the that area being an add-on after the fact. I was hoping to avoid it but it looks like I am going to have to remove the plywood, trim back those stinkin out of plumb studs with a sawzall or something and put back the sheathing so it lays in line with the adjacent walls. Since it is not a load bearing wall we should be alright. A big pain in the butt to be sure but I want it to look as smooth as possible across the front.
 
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Old 02-29-12, 11:43 AM
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What do you mean it is not a load bearing wall? It most certainly is!

If you plan on correcting the condition, I'd suggest that you build a temporary wall inside to support the ceiling/roof load. Make the studs extra tight to take off as much weight as you can. Then remove the sheathing on the exterior... examine the walls for any electrical lines that might be running left or right or downward. Run a reciprocating saw down the seam between the offset walls to completely sever that section of wall. Look for any nails holding the sill plate, and pull them with a cats paw. Depending on your floor covering, you might have to remove baseboard and cut the floor covering back 1 1/2". Then with a sledgehammer, knock the sill plate and studs back into alignment, and renail the framing around the perimeter. This will obviously create some additional work with drywall and painting on the interior.

I would question why it wasn't built this way to begin with. Why in the world wouldn't it originally have been lined up with the existing?
 
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Old 02-29-12, 02:00 PM
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I probably was not clear in my initial post. The roofs were already in place over the breezeways that the original ranches had in my neighborhood so the walls are thankfully not load-bearing. Your advice is always really appreciated though. Thanks.
 
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