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Paint stripper for old exterior paint? Or other good options?

Paint stripper for old exterior paint? Or other good options?

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  #1  
Old 07-09-12, 01:29 PM
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Paint stripper for old exterior paint? Or other good options?

I was planning to sand off all of the old paint on my house, down to wood, before doing a new, nice, paint job.

A good carpenter that was just here looking at my window sill repair job, mentioned that he has seen a fairly new chemical stripping system that some people are using. One he said (he thinks) actually goes on with a thick paper backing, and after it has done it's work you just peel it off and throw it away... but he couldn't remember the name of this system.

Anyway, thought I'd see what people have done out there, besides sanding, to remove all of their exterior paint? Since this is a DIY project, I don't really want to invest in a one time use $800 tool (this guy mentioned one that the pros use).

Ideas? and experiences?

Thanks!
 
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Old 07-09-12, 02:00 PM
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That stripper/paper thing has been around for a while.....you don't even want to ask how much it would cost to do a whole house. Even when done properly it sometimes does not remove all the old paint and requires a second go round.

They make infrared tools that soften the paint allowing it to be scraped off...but they are slow going. Not that expensive for the smaller ones...but I think they are really only suitable for historic trim items that have lost detail due to the multiple coats of paint.

They also make something called the "Paint Eater" (I think it's called) which is very effective for clapboard and flat surfaces.

There's really no reason to remove firmly bonded old paint. If the house is old, with multiple coats, you can run into issues with lead abatement rules I think. A light sanding, scape to remove loose stuff, proper priming for bare wood then 2 coats of a quality paint and you'll be good for years.

EDIT...paint eater isn't what I was thinking of....must have stuck in my head after a trip to HD. What I meant was more like an angle grinder with a vac attachment that used carbide blades.

EDIT 2.... Here's a good article from TOH....How to Strip Years of Paint Off a House | Painting | This Old House - 3
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 07-09-12 at 02:40 PM.
  #3  
Old 07-09-12, 02:31 PM
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Why do you want to remove all of the old paint?
 
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Old 07-09-12, 02:44 PM
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I was planning to sand off all of the old paint on my house, down to wood, before doing a new, nice, paint job.
Common best practice is to scrape (not sand) to remove all loose paint, sanding just a little to feather some of the deeper edges - then clean and prime.
 
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Old 07-09-12, 03:25 PM
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Hi guys, thanks for the responses. To answer the question most of you have asked, the reason I want to remove ALL of the old paint is twofold:

1. every painter that has looked at it has suggest this is all I can do for my situation

2. the painter that painted it 8 years ago did t his one one side (sanded it all down to wood) -- the most heavily weathered side. Now, 8 years later, this is the only side where the paint isn't pealing off.

I don't know what the exact name, but whatever primer/paint was applied to my house at one point back in the late 40s... doesn't allow for a perfect bond with new primer paint, as was proven by the experiment that last painter did.

The house had metal siding on it that I tore off, and all of the painters have theorized that somebody put metal on it because they couldn't get paint to stay on it -- as a result of the base layer of old primer it had.

So, I want to remove all of the old paint & primer, and take it down to wood, as the painter did on the one side of my house.
 
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Old 07-10-12, 04:19 AM
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The age of your house about guarantees there is lead base paint
A year or so ago the gov't instituted new regs for dealing with lead paint. You'll want to google them as while it's mainly for contractors, it affects diy also. I suspect a paint stripper is going to be your only option. You'll have to contain and properly dispose of all the debris.

Years ago we would have used a big sander and ground the paint off that way but now it's illegal [for good reason] to sand [airborne dust] or scrape and let the scrapings come in contact with the ground.
 
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Old 07-10-12, 05:28 AM
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I agree stripping is the way to go and I see your point now in removing all of the old paint.
 
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