Making a hole in brick siding for kitchen fan...

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Old 05-19-13, 12:22 PM
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Making a hole in brick siding for kitchen fan...

I want to get a new over the range microwave that will vent outside, through the wall it hangs on. So I'll have to rig some sort of tubing for the air to flow.

Now - as there is no vent currently, I'll need to go through brick siding. My idea was to start cutting from inside out. It appears like there is no stud in the way so I should be able to cut through drywall and remove insulation and all that. Then I get to the brick.

My idea was to drill holes in the corners of the brick, from inside out, and then go outside and use a sawsall (reciprocating saw) to cut the brick opening out.

That is where my question is: is this possible? I was at Lowes yesterday looking at blades and the guy told me that there is no way one of those things would cut through brick, and I should chisel it out instead.

What would be the right way to cut an opening like this?
 
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Old 05-19-13, 12:33 PM
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The right way? Rent a big drill with a masonry hole saw bit. How big do you need? 6"?

If you don't want to rent...then drill the holes close together around the perimeter of the opening and just knock it out with a hammer. I'd do a small hole in the center of where you want it to go, then drill from the outside in and knock to the inside as well. Less chance of spalling the brick IMO.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 12:33 PM
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If you absolutely can't vent it through the roof or up into the attic and out over the soffit, then through the wall is a way to do it, although not the most sightly method. Your thoughts of drilling repeated holes in your general circle design (4 1/2" depending on your vent) will allow you to tap the brick on the outside and allow the hole to remain intact. You will need to seal up the hole once you place the pipe in there and use a cover to hide the ugly, but it will work. A recip saw won't cut the hole you want, and you won't be able to afford a coring saw to cut the hole.

Another way would be to determine where you want it via drilled pilot hole and cut the brick with an angle grinder with a mason or diamond blade.

Edit: and I type slower than Vic on certain days.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 12:35 PM
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What size vent does the range require? Is it one of the 2x12 rectangular ducts? or do they allow some other size. Kind of important for us to know that to give good advice about the hole in the brick.

Your first step would be to drill a small pilot hole that is both level and square completely through the wall that is directly in the center of the opening. This will give you a reference point to start from. When you go outside and find the hole, you may decide that you'd like to move it up or down an inch or so... or move it left or right... depending on the layout of the brick.

A round duct would require a core bit (hole saw for masonry). A square duct might involve removing an entire brick... or drilling a series of holes in the brick. They do make abrasive blades for reciprocating saws, but I wouldn't think you'd want to cut a LOT with them... maybe just use them to clean up an irregular surface.

That's about all I can say for now.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 12:43 PM
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Can you make a rectangle opening that just requires you to pop a couple of bricks out? Would be less unsightful and easier to accomplish. I know they make rectangular ductwork, just don't know in what sizes. Will defer to the others.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 07:11 PM
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Thank you... truth is that I am not sure of the ductwork required; I kind of need to buy a new microwave first heh. The current one sounds like a jet engine and is not color coordinated anymore and wife wants it gone so I am looking. I'll learn those details and get back here if I need more details, I think I get the gist of it so far.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 07:32 PM
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Just so you know...microwave/exhaust fan combinations are notoriously bad at venting smoke and odors. I'd never have one.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 09:46 PM
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If you were to drill a hole from the inside out it's going to blow out a big hole in the area where the bit comes through.
I lay out the hole on the inside and use a small masonery bit to drill out the 4 corners.
Now I can mark the outside to finish making the hole.
I use a Bosch Bull Dog hammer drill.

Most likly your going to need one of these to run it through the wall.
range hood ducting supplies - Bing Images
 
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Old 05-19-13, 09:56 PM
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When installing anything thru brick your first step is like xsleeper stated. Drill a small hole in from the outside first to get your bearings. I'll usually drill a 1/4" hole in a seam between the bricks and then adjust the location of my hole accordingly.

Gunguy is also right about the exhausting qualities of a microwave/fan combo.
It would not work in my kitchen. When I put the fan on I want the smoke/fumes outside..... not rattling around the inside of the microwave.
 
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Old 05-21-13, 07:23 AM
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Hmmm... so you are saying that if I am going through the trouble, I should go with the actual range hood instead?

Can those things even be vented to a wall or they have to go through the roof? Due to how my roof is configured (and the fact that there is basically no space to work with on that side of the house in the attic), I expect a lot more trouble trying to go up rather than through the wall.

Perhaps this is a it OT not but what I find confusing is that some of the microwaves advertise 300-400 cfm fans while the hoods seem to start around 200 cfm?
 
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Old 05-21-13, 08:55 AM
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The dedicated exhaust fans vent out the back or the top. Not sure about the combos.

I wouldn't think a 200cfm hood would be terribly effective.
 
 

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