Making trusses for shed roof.

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  #41  
Old 06-14-13, 04:35 AM
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Well, for the most part this thing is framed. Enough to sheet the thing with plywood. Here's a pic with my trusty helper Ace.


A carpenter I know said I should be fine to sheet the exterior walls to give the building stability, and then sheet the roof. Pretty sure I'm going to go with 1/2" plywood all around and on the roof. Hoping to roof it this weekend if I can find time.

As for sheeting with plywood, would it be advisable to leave a 1/8" gap between sheets to allow for expansion and contraction? On the roof and walls? Any joints on the walls are going to be covered with one by three or something like that to give it a board and batton look.
 
  #42  
Old 06-14-13, 04:55 AM
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You definitely want to sheet the walls first! I did the roof first on the first shed I built - thought my framing was suspect, didn't feel safe at all on the roof

Don't know for sure about the gap but it's probably a good idea.
 
  #43  
Old 06-14-13, 04:59 AM
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Yes, leave a small gap on your walls. Use plywood clips on the roofing panels. It spaces the plywood and gives mid rafter support. Are you dead set on plywood for the roof? OSB in 5/8 would be sturdier and probably cheaper than plywood, but it isn't a deal breaker.

Look-outs are just fine. Glad you went ahead and did that. As you see, you needed that final support.
 
  #44  
Old 06-14-13, 05:14 AM
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Thanks guys. Yeah, there's no way I'm getting up on that roof until I sheet the walls first. I'm not the biggest fan of roofing and from the only one I've done I'm terrible at it. This one's got to be leak free under orders from my wife. Yikes.

Chandler, I'll google image the plywood clips so I know what to look for. I had no idea that osb would be sturdier! My carpenter friend said to check the price difference on 7/16" aspenite and 1/2" plywood and use whatever is cheapest. Do I sheet this right up to the edge of the rafters and sides (tails) or leave a slight overhang? I plan on putting on one by six fascia or something like that and painting it. Also plan on using dripedge and roofing felt before shingling.

Yep, real glad I did as you suggested with the top plate. It took time and was a major pain in the butt, however I think it was a very good idea in the long run.
 
  #45  
Old 06-14-13, 08:20 AM
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Well, just went and ordered the plywood for the exterior walls to be delivered. Was initially thinking of going with 1/2" sanded one side, but when the guy at the lumberyard told me the price/sheet I jumped! He asked if this was for the shed I'm building and told me to just go with regular spruce for 1/2 the price. "You're not building a piano!"
 
  #46  
Old 06-14-13, 08:37 AM
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Ya, I bet that was a shock .... and once primed and painted the difference in looks will be minimal. If it were me, I'd oil prime the bottom edge and few inches of the bottom backside of the plywood before nailing it up.
 
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Old 06-14-13, 08:49 AM
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Great idea Mark. I just thought of something else, although I'm not sure if it's necessary. I'm getting worried I'm really turning this into a fortress unnecessarily. Would it be smart to install drip cap or whatever you call it at the bottom of the plywood sheets?
 
  #48  
Old 06-14-13, 08:58 AM
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With the exception of above the blocks, I don't see where it would serve any purpose.
 
  #49  
Old 06-14-13, 10:28 AM
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At one point I read somewhere about using roofing felt as a 'moisture barrier' on the outside of the studding prior to attaching the siding or in my case plywood. Now I'm just thinking this is a waste of money. I'm really overthinking this whole bloody thing while waiting for my plywood to arrive.
 
  #50  
Old 06-14-13, 03:23 PM
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Marksr has addressed the walls. I'll do some on the roof. If you are planning on gutters, use 2x fascias. If not, then 1x fascia is sufficient. Make sure you leave enough overhang to cover over the fascia by an inch. A good way to do it is to attach a 2x4 to the rafter tails slightly low so the sheets will slide over it. Then place 2x4 scraps vertically off the spacer board so your sheets of roofing will rest against them and be equidistant from the tails and you don't have to throw them up there and risk them sliding around.

Once you are through with the decking, remove the 2x4's and you will have space for your 1x fascias and 1" overhang.
 
  #51  
Old 06-15-13, 05:31 AM
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Thanks again Chandler. I owe you a bunch for all the little tricks and tips you've given me on this thing.
 
  #52  
Old 06-15-13, 05:32 AM
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Just hope we were of some help. Gotta earn our keep
 
  #53  
Old 06-15-13, 07:25 AM
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Hi Bill,
I have to say, for a first time job you did very well. Having the advice is part of it, but listening and doing is also important. I have advised friends for years and soo many times return to see they followed the cheapest, quickest advice and the results looked like it.

Now, the next problem you will have, will be building more of these for everyone who loves your shed.

Bud
 
  #54  
Old 06-16-13, 06:04 AM
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Well, got the walls sheeted with 1/2" plywood yesterday except for the gable triangles. I am pretty happy with the way this thing is going. However, yesterday I noticed that the walls were no longer perfectly plumb, which was kind of depressing. They weren't off by a mile or anything, but they were off a bit. At this point, I didn't think there was much I could do. There's no way I am taking that roof down again. Noticed it when installing the first sheet of plywood. I know that was square, but the framing was no longer so. Boo.

Also installed some lookouts under the front overhangs. Going to do the back as well when I get to it.

The building feels wayyyyy sturdier with the walls sheeted which is nice. Like Marksr said, it made you worry about whether or not the framing was suspect or not.
 
  #55  
Old 06-16-13, 07:22 AM
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Bill, it's rare to find perfect carpentry .... but that's what us painters are for - to give the illusion of perfection
 
  #56  
Old 06-18-13, 08:41 AM
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Well, here's a pic of this thing sheeted. I asked my contractor friend if it would be ok to sheet the thing if I wasn't going to get back to this for a short while and it got rained on. He laughed and said "of course", which makes sense as I see buildings being sheeted and left in the rain all the time I guess. Well, an unexpected rain happened and some of the plywood started to delaminate around big knot holes. I'll add a pic of that too.

I assume that even when the plywood dries out completely, these aren't going to go away. Very frustrating. Not super happy about replacing I think it's three sheets of this stuff, but might not have a choice. I better get this thing oil primed as quickly as possible!

Oh, the plywood on the doorway is to keep the dogs out of there.

As you can see, the dogs left their mark on things as well.





 
  #57  
Old 06-18-13, 10:06 AM
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I wonder if cutting out the swollen plys and using a filler would be a viable option?
 
  #58  
Old 06-18-13, 10:10 AM
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Mmm, I don't think so Mark. I just got back in the house from taking another look. It's been nice and toasty here today (Canadian style, so not really toasty), and they haven't receded one bit.

They actually run vertically for over a foot in a few spots, and they're pretty big. If they were just tiny little guys, I'd agree that filler would be an option, but these are too big for that. I think.

If I run like crazy I can pull the two sheets off and replace then oil prime the sides of the shed that aren't getting hit by sun right now and by the time I'm done with those two, the other sides might be in shade.
 
  #59  
Old 06-18-13, 10:22 AM
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Well, at least you'll have plenty of shelving material ......
 
  #60  
Old 06-18-13, 11:01 AM
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You think like my wife Mark That's exactly what she said.

Two walls, and now a bit on my mouse are a lovely shade of Zinsser Cover Stain Primerian White!

Man, do I ever hate painting for myself. I bought a house with wood walls everywhere so I didn't ever have to do this. It just keeps creeping in no matter what I do.
 
  #61  
Old 06-19-13, 05:07 AM
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Well, work's screwed up for what could be the entire week so I might as well get at the part of this project that I knew I was going to hate the most.

The roof.

I'm not keen on this part as I've tried it before....... and failed. Wife and I replaced the roof on the shed that came with the house when we bought. We tried really hard, we read as much as we could and we failed horribly. That thing leaked incredibly. We patched and it still leaked. Finally we've just covered it with a tarp and that's the way it's staying til we tear that shed down. It blocks the view of the backyard from every window in the house. Terrible place for it. Don't know what the guy was thinking.

Anyhoo, I've gotta do it and there's no hiding from it. I have questions...

Decided to go with 7/16" aspenite as that's what everyone says I should use. Will be screwing it down 6" on perimeter, 12" in the field. Except at the eaves where the rafters are obviously because that's all that's there to attach to. I'll be sure to use those roofing clips Chandler mentioned as I saw them at the lumber store the other day.

I know Chandler said 1" overhang at the eave part of the roof, but what about at the gable side? I'll be putting on 1Xsomething fascia afterwards.

This is just a shed, so I'm not sure if I need ice shield? There won't be any eavetroughs going on, so I'm not sure if it's necessary.

Then comes the roofing felt. I see everyone suggests stapling this down. Does that just mean with regular T50 staples or something else? Then drip edge all around, nailed or screwed?

Then the dredded shingles. I'm really gonna hate that part. I've never cut or installed them before.

If there's one thing I don't want to screw up on this shed, it's the roof.
 
  #62  
Old 06-19-13, 05:17 AM
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Roofing isn't that difficult. I doubt you'd need the ice shield. Stapling the felt in place is ok ONLY if you can get the shingles nailed down before the wind picks up. I don't remember the name but they sell nails that have a big plastic washer to hold down the tar paper.

Cutting the shingles isn't a big deal, just use a utility knife. You don't have to cut all the way thru - one decent cut and then fold and break, slightly similar to cutting drywall. The 1st row of shingles needs to be either installed backwards or better yet cut off the exposed part [leaving the glue strip] and nail it down. That seals the bottom. Measure the width of your roof to figure out whether you can start off with a full shingle or need to trim it down some. Obviously, each row gets staggered so your joints/slits fall in the middle of a full section.
 
  #63  
Old 06-19-13, 10:49 AM
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My experience is with 3-tab shingles, not sure what you'll be using.

Read the package, it should show where to nail them. Be sure to follow that or you will have nails showing. Not good.

After I stapled the felt down every few rows I'd measure up from the bottom and snap a line to keep everything nice and straight. Probably not that important on your small roof.

If you want to get fancy have every third row line up rather than every other one. Lots of messing around but looks nice.
 
  #64  
Old 06-19-13, 10:55 AM
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Be sure to plan how many rows it will take to get to the top and adjust your overlap so the last row of shingles isn't a 2" strip. You can increase your overlap, but do not decrease it to get to where you want. Same goes for side to side. You don't want a one inch end piece.

Bud
 
  #65  
Old 06-20-13, 05:03 AM
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Well, got most of the roof sheeted yesterday. Had some other things to do so didn't get it all. Wow, what a pain in the butt when things aren't totally square.

Ended up using Chandler's jig trick which held the sheets up straight which was great. Did a one inch overlap on the gable side as well.

Will be doing the roofing felt, drip edge today and if time allows.... The dreaded shingles. Does the roofing felt go on before or after the drip edge?
 
  #66  
Old 06-22-13, 05:17 AM
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Well, here's the shed with the roof finally on. Wondering how roofers manage to trim the shingles on the edges with such a nice clean line. Tried a few, but mine keep ending up waggly and kind of ragged.

Anyhoo, I have no idea why I picked the hottest day of the summer yesterday to put the roof on. Roofing easily goes on my list of things I never want to do again.

 
  #67  
Old 06-22-13, 05:23 AM
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Lookin' good!

Not sure how the roofer's do it but I've always found it works best if I cut the shingle before I nail it in place.
 
  #68  
Old 06-23-13, 06:27 AM
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Planning on ripping 1X8 pine today down to 1X4 for door trim and the 'batton' look that will cover the plywood joints. Hoping to find uniform measurements on the sides to install them so it looks like a regular board and batton look.

Going to run the wood through my new router (finally found a use for it!) to soften the corners, prime and prepaint before installation.

Planning on going full 1x8" for the fascia boards. That's not going to look to big for this little building is it?

Any thoughts on whether a 16 guage nailer and 2 1/2" nails would do the trick in attaching this stuff? Not sure if that's enough to hold things.
 
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Old 06-23-13, 06:36 AM
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I'd be concerned that the little head on the finish gun nails won't be big enough to hold the wood in place long term. Might be ok to tack the board in place and then go back with galvanized common nails to secure it.
 
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Old 06-23-13, 06:57 AM
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Thanks Mark. I'm doing this thing completely by myself so tacking on with a gun is a good thing to start with. Holding longer lengths of wood in place while nailing, etc. is a real pain while on a ladder.

I think my wife is completely shutting down my dream of painting and making this thing look like an old fashioned red and white horse barn. When I told her that's what I wanted, I got 'the look'. I figured it's right beside the garden, that will look great! Apparently that's not going to happen.
 
  #71  
Old 06-23-13, 07:01 AM
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I've seen 'the look'

I don't know why wifes think they know more than us but unless you like misery it pays to humor them
 
  #72  
Old 06-23-13, 12:25 PM
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If you are going to drop in 2x4 lookouts, then I believe 1x6 will look more appropriate for fascia on the sides. The front is fine, and it literally defines the front. I think it would be too "weighty" on the sides having a larger board. Use at least a 15 gauge gun, or even 2 1/2" HDG deck nails into the rafter tails and lookout ends to hold the fascia on. You don't want it warping and pushing out little finishing nails. 1x6 will give you enough drop off the rafter tails and lookouts for your soffit to slide up and look finished without trim.
 
  #73  
Old 06-23-13, 08:39 PM
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Chandler, when you say adding more lookouts do you mean adding more 2x4 on the sides attached to the rafter tails horizontaly to the walls? Sorry, I get lost in all this. My plan was to install the fascia (1X8, but if you think 1X6 is fine I can go with that. I agree it would look a little heavy.) Then screw a 2X2 or 2X4 to the wall such that I could nail or screw the soffit board (1X12) to it and nail the soffit board to the fascia from the outside.

I'm probably not explaining that right.

The front, I'll probably go with 1X6 fascia as well then and hopefully 1X12 soffit. I installed lookouts for the false rafter, so there's lots to attach too.

I turned the backyard into a mill today and ripped down 1X8 to 1X3.5 and learned how to use my router (successfully for the most part, one board down. Boo) camphering the trim boards by 1/4". Made the biggest pile of sawdust I've ever created.
 
  #74  
Old 06-30-13, 10:52 AM
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Just got back into this today. Bought some 1X12" for the soffit boards and some 1X6" for the fascia. Got to play with the router again! Hoping to get it all primed today.

CANADA DAY long weekend is for getting stuff done around the house.
 
  #75  
Old 07-01-13, 06:08 AM
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Getting very close to the painting stage of this thing. Have all the trim primed. Probably going to two coat the body of the shed prior to fastening the trim. Probably going to two coat the trim as well and touch up the nail holes.

Going with Duxbury Grey for the body and the old stand by CC40 Cloud white for the trim.

Doors aren't made yet. Likely plywood with 1X3.5" trim to stiffen it up and give the hinges something to grab on to.
 
  #76  
Old 07-13-13, 11:01 AM
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How ya doing, painted yet? Curious to see how it looks....I wanna build one next year.

If you don't mind, could you tell me approximately what materials cost? I'd have to use T1-11 to match my garage but it would give me an idea.

All I know is my 26x40 garage materials were around $3,300 but that was back in '89, I shudder to think what it would cost now days.

Thanks
 
  #77  
Old 08-17-13, 01:19 PM
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Hi Baldwin! Sorry, didn't see that someone had posted in this thread again. Been chipping away at this thing for the past while. Got the body rolled out twice. Trim primed and installed. Only a little mashing of pine here and there to make that work.

Personally, I wanted a red barn type thing with white battons. Wife shot that down immediately. She picked the green colour and I was forced to comply. She's also demanding that I paint the battons green. I've left them at the primed stage now for a few weeks hoping she'll come 'round.

Not counting on that. I really like it the way it is with the white verticals. She hates it. Eventually they'll get painted in the stupid green colour or Ben Moore's CC40 Cloud White. I built the damn thing all by myself, I figure I ought to have some say in the colour choice! Other men married far longer than I have said to simply surrender. I'm having an incredibly hard time with that.

Anyhoo, not sure about the cost thus far. I'm sure we're well up into the $2K zone. I'm a little afraid to gather all the receipts and tally. Might end up having to move into the bloody thing and there's no electrical or plumbing in there!

 
  #78  
Old 08-17-13, 03:57 PM
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I've left them at the primed stage now for a few weeks hoping she'll come 'round.
I was asked to help sandblast and re paint the balustrades at our old sanctuary several years ago. Got everything sandblasted and used a really good gray primer. Ran out of time for the week, so packed up and left. Sunday one of the little old ladies exclaimed she LOVED the new color of the handrails. I didn't dare tell her it was primer, and I didn't paint them either. Little old ladies in church carry a lot of weight. They stayed primer for over a year
 
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Old 08-17-13, 04:52 PM
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That's a nice looking shed you got there! Well Done!!
 
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Old 08-17-13, 08:18 PM
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Other men married far longer than I have said to simply surrender. I'm having an incredibly hard time with that.
Yeah, I hear ya. I've been divorced since 77 and have found a good dog is so much easier. We can have breakfast at noon or supper at midnight and he couldn't care less. Always glad to see me and keeps my feet warm in the winter.

Shed looks good and thanks for the guesstimate, things sure have gone up.
 
 

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