drill bit keeps slipping in chuck


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Old 07-11-13, 06:33 PM
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drill bit keeps slipping in chuck

I am installing 7/16 inch osb as sheeting on my garage exterior walls.I"m using two and a half inch silver colored screws and they will not drill into the osb and studs without drilling holes first.My drill bit keeps slipping in the chuck.I realize these screws are pretty long.What do your recommend using to install 7/16 inch osb into hard wood? I bought some more one and five eights deck screws but the head is tapered and will not counter sink flush with osb.I've also been using soap on the screws to help slide better and it does help.This also makes 3 steps for every screw.Is this a common practice for installing osb sheeting? Thanks for your ideas.
 
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Old 07-11-13, 07:20 PM
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Why aren't you nailing it?
 
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Old 07-11-13, 08:44 PM
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drill bit keeps slipping

I have an old bullock prefab garage and they skimped on framing wherever they could.I started using nails and found I had to take some sheeting off to add support so instead of going through pulling nails again I felt using screws would be better.This is my first siding project so I am still learning.Why do they make screws anyway if the drills today won't hold up to drive a screw?I just bought a new dewalt 3/8 inch drive drill about a month ago and I guess I am to hard on it.Actually I feel handier with a drill than a hammer if the drill would do the job.I'm also using soap. Also I have about 10 lbs of galvanized 8d nails and most of them are all rusted and I kept them in my basement with a dehumidifier.Thanks for your response.
 
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Old 07-11-13, 10:09 PM
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Using deck screws on wall framing would not pass any kind of inspection because most codes specify 6d to 8d nails on sheathing, for shear strength, depending on the code. Now you may find an inspector that will work with you, depending on the screws you select, but deck screws probably aren't one of the types they would approve.

At any rate, the screws are giving you such a hard time because they are so long. You will have better luck with a torx drive or square (robertson) screw rather than a phillips. Also, an impact driver will drive screws a lot better than a drill will.
 
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Old 07-12-13, 12:04 PM
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If you are in the market for it, an air nailer will make the job go by pretty fast and you can use 8d or 6d. The OSB is pretty dense and the screw heads do not like to counter sink into it very well. Some screws will just pop the heads off if you try. If you are set on screwing, try a deck screw that is self tapping (it had a cut in the tip of the screw) and use the torx drive (it will drive better if you are not straight on every time).
 
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Old 07-12-13, 11:29 PM
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dan0661's comment reminded me of something I was going to add earlier. OSB has a smooth side and a rough side. The smooth side is hard. You should be installing the nails/screws into the rough side. It's a little softer and easier to countersink the screws into the comparatively softer rough side.
 
 

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