Best roller cover for thirsty wood?

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Old 08-05-13, 01:15 PM
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Best roller cover for thirsty wood?

New wood--especially T1-11 is so thirsty I spend more time returning to the paint tray than rolling. What's the best type & nap for rolling stains & finishes on rough wood?
 
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Old 08-05-13, 01:55 PM
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What type of coating are you using?

I never use a paint tray when painting anything other than something small. A 5 gallon bucket w/screen will speed up production. Dependent on coating used and the type of T-111, I'll use a 3/4" - 1.5" nap roller cover. I like to slop a lot of coating onto the siding and then as the roller runs out of paint - go back and even the coating [reroll] out with the drier roller.
 
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Old 08-05-13, 07:38 PM
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In the paint department you're faced with choosing between polyester, sheepskin, mohair, microfiber, fleece, knit, foam...and that's all in addition to all the nondescript cheap fuzzy covers. They all say they're perfect for all finishes so does what I'm applying really matter that much? If it does then THIS time it's Behr Premium Solid Color Waterproofing All In One Wood Stain and Sealer on T1-11.
Next time it will be Sikkens SRD transparent oil stain on raw white cedar.

And I do have the screen and 5 gallon pail but I'll still be doing more walking than rolling.
 
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Old 08-06-13, 04:33 AM
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Synthetic covers [mostly polyester] are the most commonly used. I prefer the more expensive lambswool covers ..... but then I am an old school painter Lambswool covers will wear out prematurely if used incorrectly, they can't take the abuse that a synthetic cover can. Dry rolling or pressing too hard on the cover = abuse.

Mohair covers are mainly for enamel on slick surfaces. The other types mentioned are also usually for specific applications and not everyday use. There are different variations in T-111, some are rougher than others or have deeper grooves. The deeper grooves or rougher surface usually indicate a need for a thicker nap.
 
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Old 08-06-13, 08:02 AM
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Painting my workshop is a big time consuming job and I'm not going to quibble about spending $10 for a roller vs. $5. I want one that holds the most paint. It's frustrating to only cover 10SF with each reload. I'm sure the 2nd coat will go faster, but I still want to know what works best since the next project is the first coat on my cottage (after the siding is hung).
 
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Old 08-06-13, 11:41 AM
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If the siding is not installed yet, you could paint it on the ground and then install it.
 
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Old 08-06-13, 01:09 PM
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I don't know that a lambswool cover holds more paint than a synthetic cover but it does release it better. A lot of the younger painters like the synthetic covers because they are cheap and will take abuse. Being an old school painter I never have been able to get the results out of a synthetic cover that I'm used to with lambswool. I also get less roller spray out of lambswool covers than I do with synthetic.

For me, it's cheaper to pay twice as much for a lambswool cover - it's easier for me to use and with care, will last a long time. Not everyone gets the same results - a lot comes down to personal preference.

If pre priming/painting the T-111, it's a good idea to coat the bottom edge and a little bit up the backside of the plywood.
 
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Old 08-06-13, 01:39 PM
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If pre priming/painting the T-111, it's a good idea to coat the bottom edge and a little bit up the backside of the plywood.
30 year old building but thanks. Good to know about the better release. Another frustration is having to go over the same spot with a freshly-wet roller because it "won't give it up"

I hope to be going through it all again in about a month once the cedar is up on my cottage. It's planed--not rough-sawn so it shouldn't be too brutal on lambswool.

I'd like to try airless but because of the wind off the lake I'm worried I'd end up not making the attempt for fear of overspray on my new windows.
 
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Old 08-06-13, 02:05 PM
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Keeping or even cleaning overspray off of the windows isn't a big deal .... but could become a big deal if you're not careful. I prefer using a spray shield over masking - it's quicker and sometimes masking will get blown off with the pressure from the gun

Also spraying doesn't eliminate the need for a roller. The paint should still be back rolled [or back brushed] to work the paint into the substrate. Doing so results in both a better looking and longer lasting paint job.
 
 

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