Filling cracks on fascia board

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Old 08-08-13, 03:26 PM
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Filling cracks on fascia board

I've scraped and sanded most of the fascia board on my house. What is the best material to use to fill the cracks and bad spots before I paint? Also, can I spray my gutters before I paint the fascia? Any suggestions would be appreciated!
 
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Old 08-08-13, 03:34 PM
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Not sure what these cracks look like / how big they are, but I would probably use painters putty, which is almost like window glazing. The Sherwin Williams stores here sell a product called Crawford's Painter's Putty in a quart can, and it's pretty easy to handle, doesn't get all over your hands like some do.

I'd probably suggest you use an oil primer on the bare parts of the fascia, assuming you have scraped down to bare wood, and then spray the gutters, and then paint the fascia. Spraying the gutters first might coat the fascia with overspray that does not bond to bare wood as well as brushing on a coat of oil primer would.

Oh I forgot you are in California. Do they even let you use oil primers out there?
 
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Old 08-08-13, 03:35 PM
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Caulking generally works best for filling cracks in exterior wood. Do you intend to paint the gutters with the same paint as the fascia? How will you be spraying it? how do you intend to keep the overspray off of the roof?
 
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Old 08-08-13, 03:51 PM
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My original idea was to use the same paint. Will that work? I have both an airless and a gravity feed gun. I was planning on the gravity feed, covering the roof tiles with cardboard and draping plastic below. What type of caulking?
 
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Old 08-08-13, 03:57 PM
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Quality latex house paint works fine on aluminum. IMO paint with a sheen looks better than flat. I'd prime the fascia and then caulk the cracks with a siliconized acrylic latex caulk [it's paintable] I doubt you can use your gravity feed with latex paint - you'd have to thin it too much. Call the overspray that gets on the fascia your 1st coat Brush a 2nd coat of house paint on the fascia after the 1st coat has dried.
 
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Old 08-08-13, 06:46 PM
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Yes we can still use oil based primer. Kilz oil base is readily available along with a few others. Is it ok to paint latex over an oil base primer?
 
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Old 08-08-13, 08:54 PM
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Yes it is okay.

However regarding your choice of using Kilz, one of the things Kilz is known for is being fast drying. At least one professional painter that I work with says he does not like any sort of quick drying oil primers, as he feels that they do not penetrate into the wood fully. Whether or not that's true, I don't know, but it makes sense and this painter really knows his stuff and does high quality work.
 
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Old 08-09-13, 04:55 AM
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I agree! Kilz isn't a good choice for priming exterior wood. Quick drying primers tend to be more for sealing stains, long primers suck into the substrate better. I would use SWP's A-100 exterior oil base primer ..... or the equivalent from another paint manufacture. Each type of primer is formulated for specific uses and although they overlap some - it's best to use the type of primer formulated for the job at hand.
 
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Old 08-11-13, 04:28 PM
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OK... I took back the Kilz and replaced it with SW oil base primer. (we can only buy it in qts. in CA as we might hurt ourselves with a gallon). Now due to the wind and potential for overspray mess, I've decided not to spray the gutters. Any suggestions on how to paint them? Roll, brush?? What kind of roller? Again, thank you for all your help as I'm just an amateur trying to achieve decent results.
 
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Old 08-12-13, 04:39 AM
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I'd use a quality brush [I'm partial to the Purdy brand but there are plenty of other good manufactures] If you add Flood's Floetrol or XIM's Extends to latex paint it will slow the drying time down a little which helps the paint to flow together eliminating or minimizing brush marks. It also helps to avoid painting in direct sunlight.
 
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Old 08-14-13, 10:18 AM
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Thanks to everyone for their input. I have the flotrol and will be painting on the first day we are under 100*. I'll post the result?
 
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Old 08-18-13, 08:04 PM
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Used Flotrol at 1 to 4 ratio and went ahead and tried pushing it thru my gravity feed. The gutters came out beautiful. Maybe a bit less lustre than the fascia that I painted with with Flotrol and a good brush, but overall I'm happy. Thanks again everyone.
 
 

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