HardiePlank over existing wood siding?

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Old 10-24-13, 02:03 PM
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HardiePlank over existing wood siding?

Does anyone know whether HardiePlank can be installed directly over existing wood siding, or will this void the Warranty?

It has been suggested to us that Hardie must be installed on a flat wall surface that is covered with house wrap and a rain screen.

Does this mean that HardiePlank cannot be installed directly over existing wood siding without voiding the Warranty?

The Hardie website is unclear on this issue. Several contractors have suggested that the wood siding need not be removed.

This would be on an older house, but the wood siding is in good condition.



Thank you for any information.
 
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Old 10-24-13, 03:19 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Not sure about warranty but I would want house wrap between the wood and the Hardie.
 
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Old 10-24-13, 04:47 PM
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The term "wood siding" is kind of generic. Are you talking about going over wood lap siding? Or is your wood siding one of the 303 plywood profiles?

At any rate, their instructions specifically state:

• HardiePlank lap siding may be installed on flat vertical wall applications only.

If you have wood lap siding, that is not a "flat" vertical wall surface.
 
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Old 10-24-13, 06:53 PM
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If this is lap siding it needs to go.
Got some pictures of the siding and trim?
Vinyl siding can go over it, Hardee can not.
 
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Old 10-27-13, 12:00 PM
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hardieplank over wood siding?

Thanks for your responses. The existing wood siding is of a type sometimes called Dutch or German siding. It lies flat. Here's an example from the internet. Mine looks like this only mine has been painted over the years. Seems to me we ought to be able to put hardieplank over this. What do you think?
http://www.buffalo-lumber.com/images...siding-400.jpg
Also tried to attach pics of my existing wood siding and got two to upload. Mine is blue. Hope this helps.
We love the old wood siding but it has to be painted every 3 or 4 years and that is expensive. That's why we are considering the Hardieplank which has many good qualities including it won't need paint for 15 years or so.
Welcome your thoughts.
 
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Old 10-27-13, 05:43 PM
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IMO it would not be a good idea to go over it. Number one, you can't shoot the hardiplank siding into the voids in your dutch lap siding.

Number two, even if you tried to match the exposure of the existing siding (let's say the dutch siding is 5" on center, and you picked 6 1/4" hardi that would also have a 5" exposure) so that you would always be nailing the new siding into the "flat part" of the existing siding, can you really say that the new siding layout is going to perfectly match the old siding layout all the way around the house and all the way up? Not really.

And third, the surface of your new siding would be built out an additional 3/4" or so around all your windows, doors and trim, meaning the new siding would probably extend PAST the windows a bit, making caulking the cut edges impossible.

It's always much better if you can tear off the existing siding, cover the house with your new WRB, and then apply the new siding. Sorry if that's not what you wanted to hear but tearing off the old siding is probably the easiest part.
 
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Old 10-28-13, 06:07 PM
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Thank you X sleeper. Another factor: My existing wood siding has no sheathing under it. It is nailed onto the studs. So if I were to remove it, the blown-in insulation I have would need to be replaced, sheathing added, housewrap and then the Hardieplank. Also, since I'd be adding sheathing, I'd probably have to redo the trim around windows and doors so it protruded enough to provide caulk surface for hardieplank. That seems like a lot.
If this were your house, what would you do? Can I put Hardieplank over this and still have it look good?
All help appreciated.
 
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Old 10-28-13, 06:53 PM
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UGH! This must be a pretty old house.

Well, this is a tough one. Let's assume tearing the dutch lap siding off is not an option, due to the cellulose insulation behind. Applying new 3/8 or 7/16" plywood or OSB sheathing, followed by housewrap would give you the "best" substrate for the siding. But that's a lot of expense, and locating your studs through all that would be difficult.

Instead, I might:

-attempt to shim the widest of the grooves (top picture) with strips of 1/4" foam fanfold that I've cut on a table saw, stapling them onto the siding with a hand stapler. Then I'd cover the entire wall with 1/4" fanfold, held with cap nails. Place the cap nails directly over each of your studs to identify where they are. (this helps later when you go to nail on the siding) I'd tape all the seams in the fanfold with a compatible seam tape, so that the fanfold becomes your WRB. Then I'd feel okay applying the cement siding.

Keep in mind that this is adding a total of approximately 1" to the thickness of the wall, so go around the house and think about what this is going to do to each window, corner, door, etc. You will probably need to trim everything with 5/4 trim after you apply the fanfold, but prior to installing the siding. That way the siding will have something to butt up to, so that you can caulk the siding to the 5/4 trim. You will want to apply z-flashing over any horizontal 5/4 trim you apply, like at the top of your windows. I'd suggest maybe using LP Smarttrim, Miratec or something similar. Fiber cement 5/4 trim is kind of a pain in the neck to work with, and I avoid it whenever possible. You will also likely want to put corner boards on each outside corner and a 1x1 piece in every inside corner, for the siding to butt up to.
 
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Old 10-29-13, 12:58 PM
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Thanks again x sleeper. Yes, the house is an old farmhouse dating back to at least the 1920's and perhaps the 1870's. We have an 1877 map showing a house at our location and I think it's the original part of our house.
But no matter. Your suggestions are very wise. Here's my question. If we just put on housewrap and then the Hardieplank, can it still look good without being wavy or crooked or whatever, and hold up over the years?
Welcome your opinion. Painting again is starting to look like a good option....
Welcome the views of all others as well. If this were your house, what would you do, considering it needs to be painted every 4 years or so?
Many thanks in advance.
 
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Old 10-29-13, 04:50 PM
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Like I mentioned earlier, you can't shoot the hardiplank siding into the voids in your dutch lap siding.

At some point, the top edge of the hardiplank will fall right along the void, and it will want to tip back into the void when it is nailed. Additionally, when you are blind nailing, the nail will blow out the back side of the hardiplank if the siding is not solidly sitting on a flat surface- if there is a void behind the siding at the point of the nail, it will make a blowout around the back side of the siding around the nail. That means the nail is really only holding into about 3/16" of the siding, and that weakens the installation to the point where the pieces may eventually get loose and rattle due to the siding being thin and blown out around the nail.

You could try and shim the grooves out with something, then apply the Tyvek, but that would be a lot of work. And you will still probably find that the new siding will stick out beyond your window trim in places.
 
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Old 11-03-13, 10:46 AM
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Thanks again. Considering the complexity, I think we'll paint. I think you guys helped us avoid a mistake- we had several contractors saying they would go right over the existing siding, no problem. I might be willing to go with Hardieplank if I knew the result would be perfect, but the thought of spending that $$$ and still have issues, no thanks.
 
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Old 11-03-13, 08:17 PM
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My concern is mainly with "blind nailing", where the siding is nailed along the top edge of the siding. This is the way most fiber cement is installed. If you face nail, along the bottom edge of the siding, the problems I mentioned would be much less. But most people don't want to see the nails. If you did face nail, I would suggest you use stainless steel ring shank nails, or at the least, hot dipped galvanized ring shanks nails. DEFINITELY not electrogalvanized nails, which quickly rust right through the paint.
 
 

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