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aluminum bending methods for fascia, windows gable ends etc.

aluminum bending methods for fascia, windows gable ends etc.

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Old 12-06-13, 08:32 AM
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aluminum bending methods for fascia, windows gable ends etc.

Hello all. I've watched several instructional videos on the subject of working with a metal brake and how to bend... but all if not most of them all seem to contradict one another. Does anyone know of a book that describes in detail the best methods of bending aluminum to wrap fascia boards windows rakes and gable ends. Some videos I've watched suggest to cover the gable end first then the fascia second, others say this is wrong.... If a book existed that demonstrates when and when not to use silicone, what type of nails should be used, when to hem...and other tips that would be helpful. Thanks!
 
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Old 12-06-13, 10:07 AM
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Don't know of any books, but you start at your lowest point and work upward so you will have everything lapped properly. Braking metal DIY is a salvage man's dream. You will have quite a bit of waste and boogers that a pro would not. It takes practice, but you can do it.
 
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Old 12-06-13, 11:23 AM
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Thanks Chandler, I've seen 90 degree folds that lap corners with intricate cuts that allow the aluminum to fold, all the while ensuring a water tight seal. I know everyone in the business of siding has developed their own techniques over time, but all those derive from a source a bible if you will. Standard correct procedures is what im looking for. Hopefully others with some expertise can chime in.
 
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Old 12-06-13, 03:04 PM
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Good luck trying to "save" money trying to do this DIY.
Seem like a simple enough but I've never once seen someone else do it so it would pass my inspection.
Or ever seen any video showing all the in's and outs.
Never once have I even seen someone invest in the tools I use to install it so face nails are kept to
a minimum.
To do this right you would need at least a 10'6" brake, 6" seamers, snap lock punch, snips, speed
square, elongated hole punch for trim nails, pea shooter nail punch, stainless steel trim nails.
 
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Old 12-09-13, 06:54 AM
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Wow, seems like a whole lot... Some of us werent fortunate to be taught a trade growing up from our fathers. Does that mean it can't be learned?. I've seen techniques where installers omit any face nails all together opting to nail underneath instead. There are classes available that teach installation but those classes are a little too far for my travel. And it's not as much about "saving" money, its more about long term goals. Would you say the tools are a worthwhile investment, if you're planning on purchasing are repairing old homes? A set of pumpjacks are probably the most costly investment tool which I already have. With the advent the internet and well written instructional books the learning curve is shortened. Admittingly it would be a lot better with a hands on experienced person such as yourself teaching and overlooking projects, but for most of us, this is a luxury that can't be afforded. Thanks for your reply joecaption1.
 
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Old 12-09-13, 08:11 AM
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Even a used brake will cost about $800.00, new is double that.
Several different size seamers, snips, pea shooter, Snap lock and punch for trim nail sized holes would be another couple of hundred easy. I own all those plus a brake buddy, stand, the cutting tool.
Only took about $3000.00 in tools and a few thousand for a trailer only to have customers complain about having to pay $100.00 to fix one piece of trim that fell off.
No caulking should be needed when installing coil stock.
I only use stainless steel trim nails, those cheap aluminum nails sold at the box store are to thick so they dent the trim and like to bend instead of going in.
I can not imagine setting up pump jacks to just install a new fascia.
Extension ladders, stand offs, ladder jacks and a walk board would be the way I would go.
Not sure it would work out but you might volunteer to help work on a Habitat for Humanity house when there installing the trim.
Pay a small time contractor to come install it and watch how it's done.
Some places sell preformed aluminum fascia.
Do not use the premade vinyl!!! Unless you want a wavy mess.
 
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Old 12-09-13, 12:25 PM
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Thanks for those bits of advice, the volunteer work sounds like a great plan.
 
 

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