Stucco repair

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-30-13, 11:04 AM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 9
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Stucco repair

Hi all, I'm a newbie to the forum and to home DIY. I'd like to tackle the job of fixing stucco that is falling apart around the house. While I've seen a great deal of helpful instructions all over the 'net, I'd like to be sure I approach the correct steps to fix existing stucco issues. We moved to the house in Los Angeles with newly finished exterior in 2010, until the stucco issues started appearing . Thanks in advance for your help. Please let me know if you have questions.
Name:  20131226_081835.jpg
Views: 6089
Size:  50.2 KB
Name:  20131226_081854.jpg
Views: 3436
Size:  49.8 KB
Name:  20131226_081930.jpg
Views: 6933
Size:  39.7 KB
 
  #2  
Old 12-30-13, 11:45 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,827
Received 361 Votes on 318 Posts
Welcome to the forums!

I'm a painter not a mason but I've made quite a few of those types or repairs as a favor for my customers. I'd scrape and/or wire brush off anything that is loose and then apply some mortar trying to replicate the existing texture. If it's hot and dry, misting the area to be repaired with a little water will slow down the drying time helping it to bond better.

Some of the others might have better methods so stayed tuned
 
  #3  
Old 12-30-13, 11:54 AM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 9
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
marksr, thanks for your suggestion, will stay tuned. Is there any specific brand of mortar you use?
 
  #4  
Old 12-31-13, 04:53 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,827
Received 361 Votes on 318 Posts
I generally use whatever is handy ...... anything from a partial bag given to me by a mason to whatever brand the big box store sells. If you get the ready mix mortar you won't have to add sand.
 
  #5  
Old 12-31-13, 12:41 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: California
Posts: 1,917
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
I see this all the time. I have a concrete engineer friend and he and I discuss the cause. What we decide is it is moisture related and capillary action.

But here is how I fix it. I thought I was doing everything right but I noticed on my own house some came back.

I attack the stucco with a floor scraper vigorously. If the stucco is sound the floor scraper can't hurt it. If it is loose then that should be enough to take it off.
Then I mix some muriatic acid in a fairly weak solution and scrub the exposed bascoat and surrounding area thoroughly and with great effort. Keep a house handy and rinse very well and completely as you go along. You don't want the acid solution to dry or soak in. This will neutralize the alkaline salts that have leached out of the stucco and/or up from the ground.

Let this dry. But you can do the next step the same day usually
Paint the exposed stucco base coat well with a good bonding agent like Weld-Crete by Larsen's Products, probably the best. This needs to dry but can be lsft exposed for a few days. Don't do this if it might rain and splash mud on the bonding agent. In fact don't do any of this if it will get dirty again before you finish the job.

Sometimes the deterioration is deep enough that you need some new base coat. If so use the stuff in a bag so you don't have to get both plastic cement and sand or Portland cement, lime and sand. It's just easier.

BUT usually only a new finish coat is needed. Take a chunk of what you scraped off and take it to the supplier. If it is not too old a formula they have the same stuff on hand. Some will even give you a gallon or so which is enough to do several square feet of patch. Otherwise buy the 90# bag. It isn't that costly.

Spread the material over the patch and screed it off flush with the existing and when it is tight enough that you won't mess it up or hollow it out float it with a red sponge float and blend it into the surrounding. You might have to wet the edges to do this.

Then you are ready to texture. If this is a small patch just do the best you can. If it large then watch some video or watch some plasterers do a California knockdown and do it like they do it. If it is good you are done. If it is really bad you can scrape it off before it sets and try again. This is not how your house was done but you might come pretty close by flicking some of your mortar form a whisk broom and then knocking it down when it has tightened up enough. Timing is critical but also forgiving.

It's my observation that this problem happens more often in stucco that has been painted and it is usually within 18" of the grade. Most often right below the sill plate and what is on the slab or foundation is usually better that at the top of the foundation. bottom of the framing.

I think I know why but my friend and I disagree on this and then once in a while I run into an area that does not support my theory.
 
  #6  
Old 01-03-14, 06:56 PM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 9
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
tightcoat, thanks for the detailed response. As part of the last step, why is it necessary to texture when it can be finished by blending with a float? Thanks again!
 
  #7  
Old 01-03-14, 07:13 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: California
Posts: 1,917
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
Floating works the joinings nice and flush. When you have done that you will see that it still needs texture.
 
  #8  
Old 01-04-14, 05:08 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,827
Received 361 Votes on 318 Posts
TC, I think what the OP's asking is - can't it all be done with one application of mud? I'm not a mason but whenever I've made minor repairs to stucco like that, I've just applied one coat of mud. My stucco repairs were mostly as a favor to my customers so their house and my paint job would look better. When I worked in fla, stucco over concrete block was normally done as a one coat/step application.
 
  #9  
Old 01-04-14, 06:15 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: California
Posts: 1,917
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
Yes the texture can be added as soon as the first pass is floated. Or I suppose one could forego the floating but I would not. It is not necessary to wait between passes if the first pass is tight enough.
 
  #10  
Old 01-05-14, 04:54 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,827
Received 361 Votes on 318 Posts
OK, I think I understand I always considered it just one coat because it was all done at the same time but never considered filling/leveling off the depression and then adding the texture as two coats.
 
  #11  
Old 01-05-14, 03:10 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: California
Posts: 1,917
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
Îf you look at the pictures you will see that there is some texture to the background. Probably it was sprayed, called dash then the foreground was added. If the texture s added to ax surface left as it would be behind he trowel it would not match. Floating is not dashing but at least it raises some sand to take away the slickness that would be there without it. I would do all of a side and get it filled in and flattened and floated then drop back and add the texture. If all there is is a few square feet then I would spread its, float it then drink a pop and then go back and texture it.

In my first post i described the steps I would take with no concern to the time between coats if any.
 
  #12  
Old 01-05-14, 09:23 PM
L
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 9
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK, so given the size of a job I have to do on 3 different walls, I would scrape off, clean with muriatic acid, apply mortar, and finally texture. What is used to texture, or is it the same material used (mortar)? How about color-matching with the rest of the wall?
 
  #13  
Old 01-05-14, 09:54 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: California
Posts: 1,917
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
The sixth paragraph of my long post says it.
 
  #14  
Old 01-06-14, 05:01 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,827
Received 361 Votes on 318 Posts
Are you sure it's tinted stucco and not painted stucco? It can be difficult to touch up old weathered paint so it doesn't show.

TC, the pics look similar to the stucco that's real popular in fla. I've never seen them spray the stucco, it was always troweled on. Most were just one coat of stucco over bare concrete block .... but I was always more concerned with painting the stucco, not how it was applied
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: