Help! What to do about this siding issue?!?

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Old 01-23-14, 12:21 PM
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Help! What to do about this siding issue?!?

Hi Everyone,

So I am closing on a house and there is one issue with the siding in the back. The corner piece does not match up with the siding and there is a big gap where rain can get in. How do I fix this? - without redoing the entire siding of the house?
Here are some pics:





Some kind of cap?

Thanks
Joe
 
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Old 01-23-14, 01:26 PM
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Photo

Show us another photo made from a little farther back so we can see what is above.
 
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Old 01-23-14, 01:59 PM
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This is the best I can do right now. Here is the back of the house. The blue arrow shows where it is. Basically the side of the house above the garage roof is EIFS and it is where the vinyl matches it. It is at the top of the first story.

 
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Old 01-23-14, 05:17 PM
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The problem isn't so much that the vinyl siding is gapped open... the problem is that there was no z-flashing installed under the bottom edge of the EIFS (blame the guy who installed the EIFS) to flash any vinyl siding that is under it.

They have installed a 90 corner on what is probably a 45 bay. When that's done, the corner is basically bent, stretched back to the house and nailed. Maybe they didn't stretch it enough. Maybe the siding was cut too tight and pushed the corner when it expanded. Hard telling.

You would have to take all the siding off both sides of the corner, push the corner tighter to the house and renail it. And even then, your vinyl siding is not meant to be water tight. Vinyl siding relies on the WRB (housewrap) behind it to prevent leaks. You get water behind the siding in places that are too numerous to mention... this is just one of them. So fix it if you want but IMO if your house has a WRB it's a non-issue. Not like anyone can see it from the ground either.
 
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Old 01-23-14, 06:59 PM
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Unfortunately, in 1993 - when it was built in VA, housewrap was optional. So I need to figure out the best way to stop water from getting in. I am thinking some kind of flashing that I afix and caulk....
 
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Old 01-23-14, 09:37 PM
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ugh. Why, why why. This is the greatest example of a complete brain fart. The person who allowed that to be "code" at the time, I mean. It just goes beyond all common sense. Sorry to hear that.

You should take a rectangle shaped piece of metal (maybe 6x6), cut a corner out of it that will match the shape of the EIFS wall, and the sided wall (a 135 section will be cut out). Then slip that back under the EIFS until it hits the sheathing. Now take a pencil and trace around the corner. When you pull it back out, trim it about 3/8" longer than the pencil line. Then bend the metal on the pencil line (bend a straight line, don't follow the contour of the wavy vinyl corner). Put a little silicone on the back side of the flaps you bent and slide it in. Then caulk the top where it meets the EIFS and siding with a polyurethane sealant. Clear might be best.

Do NOT caulk inside any j-channels or corners. Siding pieces have to be free to slide back and forth as they expand and contract. Even caulking the top of the siding to your metal piece will "pin" the siding to the metal, and when the siding wants to slide, it will want to take the metal piece with it. So you NEVER want to caulk a large area of the siding to anything. It has to be able to move or it will buckle or ripple.

I don't want to alarm you, but you better unzip the siding below your windows, using a Malco Sideswiper siding unlock tool. Examine the left and right bottom corners below each window for water damage. Water drains behind the siding at these locations. With no housewrap, there may be some damage, depending on the frequency of wind & rain and the substrate used. If needed, we can post one type of solution to this sort of leakage.
 
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Old 01-24-14, 08:39 AM
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Thanks for the reply. So are you saying I should pretty much take all the siding off the back around the windows and check the substrate - probably OSB without wrap - ARGH!!!
As for putting a cap on that - shape a piece of metal to create a kind of cap.
Like below:


Fold up on the back yellow lines so it goes up under the dryvit a little and then flat and fold the front yellow lines down it creates a "cap". Is that what you are saying?

Thanks
Joe
 
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Old 01-24-14, 06:18 PM
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No, you won't be able to make an upward bend on the back side. And upward bend would be nice, but you would have to remove the siding and the corner post to get it in. The flashing you make will have to be flat, and you will slip it in flat and then try and caulk the top edge. But I don't recommend that you caulk inside the j-channel. The siding on the left needs to be able to expand and contract. (needs to be able to slide left and right)

You don't need to take off "all the siding". You probably only need to take off "one piece" of siding, below each window. It will be the piece of siding that is notched out around the bottom corners of the window. You will use the Malco Sideswiper siding unlock tool to unzip the pieces of siding that are ABOVE the piece you need to remove. You will then be able to pull the nails in the piece of siding you need to remove... and then either unzip it with the Sideswiper, or pull it straight down to remove it.

You will probably find water damage on the sheathing (bottom left and right corners of the window) where some of the water that is running down the vertical j-channels runs down behind the siding. The sides of the house that don't get hit with driving rain and wind will probably be fine. But the sides of the house that get hit with rain and wind will be the most susceptible to damage.

The best solution is obviously to apply a WRB...but that would mean removing ALL the siding. A stop-gap measure is to make flashings for areas that see the most water infiltration. You would take a large piece of flashing (like 12" x 12") place it on top of the nailing fin of the row of siding that is BELOW the one that you removed, and center it over the bottom corner of the window. You would draw a vertical line to mark the edge of the side j-channel, and draw a horizontal line to mark the edge of the bottom j-channel. You would then square these lines off, and cut a notch out so that the flashing will fit around the corner of the window. Pull any nails out of the j-channel that prevent you from slipping this flashing behind the j-channel. And like I mentioned earlier, the bottom edge of this flashing should lay over the nailing fin of the row of siding below.

What that does is it directs any water back out to the weep holes ASAP, rather than letting it soak the sheathing all the way down the house until it drips out from behind the bottom of the siding.

Let us know what you find.
 
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