Aluminum Fascia Fastening Options?

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-16-14, 09:12 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Missouri
Posts: 144
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Aluminum Fascia Fastening Options?

Consider these images, the first two showing the only part of my house that didn't have the old aluminum fascia removed during a roofing job. What was taken down was intended to be put back up, but was all stolen. So now I'm replacing ALL fascia, thanks to the robbers.

http://www.extraordinaryimage.com/images/fascia1.jpg

http://www.extraordinaryimage.com/images/fascia2.jpg

http://www.extraordinaryimage.com/images/fascia2.jpg

http://www.extraordinaryimage.com/images/fascia2.jpg

Anyhoo - notice in the first couple images how the old aluminum fascia comes right down to meet the siding channel. This means there's not really any access to the bottom flange of the fascia to nail up through the new. I know you're not really supposed to face nail the fascia, but this is how the old was put on.

I'm not seeing any other option, though, to fasten the fascia. I thought about either trying to nail through the face, but up nearly under the drip edge, using a nail set. Or, what about actually nailing down through the drip edge itself. There's a little flange on the drip edge that flares out a bit. Would it be awful to nail down through that, then through the fascia underneath? I suppose that might encourage water penetration more than trying to nail up under the drip edge a bit.

Just wondering if I'm NOT thinking of some option that would hide the fasteners.

I saw on one "how to" page online that one guy suggests using color-matched caulk/adhesive where the fascia seams meet. Anyone think that's good or bad?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-17-14, 04:35 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,512
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
A really good adhesive could hold everything in place. If you face nail, plan a pattern so it looks like it belongs. I use torque cabinet screws (washer heads) for some outside applications, they are bronze colored and never seem to streak or corrode. Just a thought.

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 10-17-14, 05:40 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Missouri
Posts: 144
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Can you be more specific about a "really good adhesive?" For example, what product would you consider?

If I use and adhesive, would I just use a spot every 2-3 feet (like nails) to allow for the expansion and contraction of aluminum?
 
  #4  
Old 10-17-14, 06:13 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,512
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
This is not something I have specifically done, but there are adhesives for everything.

The last I used for gluing 3 layers of 1/2" plywood together was Loctite PL3X. Wood and metal are among its long list of acceptable surfaces.

As for expansion and contraction I cannot advise other than don't install the full length with one long piece.

Let's see if some of the pros here have suggestions.

Bud
 
  #5  
Old 10-17-14, 08:24 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Missouri
Posts: 144
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I did some more research, including calling both Loctite and Liquid Nails companies about their possible solutions, including the PL3X. The downside of the polyurethanes (such as PL3X) they told me is that these products must be mechanically braced or held together during curing. No way to really do that on the fascia because the whole point is that I don't want to nail through it.

Loctite's suggested product was Power Grab Heavy Duty. The reviews on this product, though, are a real mixed bag, with quite a few that suggest it simply doesn't hold or becomes very brittle after drying. Hmm . . . needing something that will remain flexible to move with the aluminum.

More questions than answers so far.
 
  #6  
Old 10-17-14, 09:35 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,512
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
Are you familiar with under sill trim used with vinyl siding? Here's my strange thinking. If you cut a piece of flat trim, say 1" wider than what you want to cover (or a strip for each top and bottom), and then bent the top and bottom 1/2" over to form a captive slot. You could then nail this over the desired area and then cut a finish piece that you cup and slide into those slots.

The bottom could bend the other way and slide onto a flat edge but friction would be all that would be holding the cover piece in place. Maybe some glue as well. They rent the trim benders, can't remember how much, I have my own.

I would bet a tin man would have a few tricks.

Bud
 
  #7  
Old 10-17-14, 10:20 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Missouri
Posts: 144
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I think I kinda understand what you mean. Not totally sure 'cause I've never bent metal or really done metal work.

I see you're in Maine. I lived in Maine as a child - up in Cutler, 2 hours due east of Bangor. Still love it up there and visit once in awhile.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: