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How to re-fasten faux beam "ends" to exterior fiber cement siding?

How to re-fasten faux beam "ends" to exterior fiber cement siding?

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  #1  
Old 11-07-14, 02:36 PM
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How to re-fasten faux beam "ends" to exterior fiber cement siding?

Hi,

I'd like advice on the best way to re-fasten some faux (decorative) beam ends to the exterior of my house.

Please see the attached picture.

I think the siding is fiber cement, and the white trim is more of a fiber board. It appears the faux beams were originally fastened via nails from the inside of the wall going outside, such that the head of the nail was embedded behind the wall and the body stuck into the beam. In addition, it appears they also toenailed in two nails at the top of the beam, going into the wall, which have since pulled out of the beam.

However, as you can see in the attached photo, these beams are sagging off the walls.

What's the best way for me to repair these?

I considered "toe nailing" long wood screws into the beams at an angle from the outside, so they'd protrude through the beams and into the wall, but I'm concerned about what these long screws could hit inside the wall, and if they'd be strong enough to last the Colorado weather.

I'm leaning towards considering attaching some type of angle bracket or hanger at the top of the beams, that would be screwed into the siding.

If I did this, would I need some type of anchor (like a drywall anchor) in the siding to prevent the screws from pulling out over time?

What steps should I take, if any, to prevent water from seeping into the new screw holes I make in the siding? Should I caulk around the top side of the bracket, or put some sort of sealing film behind the bracket?

I may be over-complicating this repair. Thanks in advance for your advice.

Aaron

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  #2  
Old 11-07-14, 02:52 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Can you provide a pic or two from further away as well?
 
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Old 11-07-14, 03:04 PM
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Hopefully the next pic will tell, but what is holding up the beam at the other end? It looks like the beam needs to be lifted back into place before you can reattach it.
 
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Old 11-07-14, 03:23 PM
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Thanks for welcoming me, and for the quick replies.

Sorry for not being clear. I've attached a picture from further away.

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Old 11-07-14, 05:36 PM
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Why are they even there?
There just going to be an on going mantaince issue and may cause more damage then good.
 
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Old 11-08-14, 02:17 PM
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They're just decorative. There are dozens of them around the exterior of the house. Most of them are staying in place OK because they're attached at their front ends to the overhanging eve or rake of the roof. There are just 3 or 4 that are coming off -- the ones that are cantilevered off the side of the house without any other support.

They might cause more problems down the road, but it seems like something that could be fixed relatively easily. I was just looking for tips on how to do so.

Thanks.
 
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Old 11-08-14, 04:30 PM
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I've painted quite a few houses that had those type of decorative beams but I've never installed any. I would think any toe nailing or screws would be fine as long as there is good lumber to attach it to. IMO a good bead of caulk along the top/sides would go along ways toward keeping the fake beam attached [so water can't get behind it]
 
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Old 11-08-14, 05:34 PM
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Isn't there a type of pocket screw sorta thing that would work here? Of course you need solid wood...not just siding behind it.
 
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Old 11-08-14, 05:54 PM
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gunguy you beat me to it, here is something I use all the time.
Kreg K4 Pocket-Hole System-K4H at The Home Depot
 
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Old 11-11-14, 10:46 AM
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Thanks to everyone for your replies.

That pocket hole jig looks cool, but I passed on it for this job because of its price.

I ended up screwing a couple corner braces at the top of the beams into what I think is solid wood behind the siding. I'm hoping the braces and screws will hold the weight of the beams better than nails alone.

Good idea to caulk along the sides, too, to keep out water.

Thanks again, everyone.
 
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