Synthetic Stucco (EIFS)

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-03-15, 05:50 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
Synthetic Stucco (EIFS)

This was my first experience with Synthetic Stucco, so I googled it. Oh, gee, what a pandora's box!! A client/agent who is selling a $400k home asked me to check a corner of the living room as the hardwood flooring seemed weak. Punching my finger through the flooring was a bad indicator. He asked me to do some exploratory surgery to see exactly what the damage was and its extent. I'll let a couple of pictures take up my 1000 word dissertation. It isn't pretty.

Name:  brown right porch.jpg
Views: 1136
Size:  32.3 KB

Name:  brown left porch.jpg
Views: 1277
Size:  32.4 KB

Name:  brown inside right.jpg
Views: 1232
Size:  24.8 KB

The OSB sheathing is the pile of termite poop in the floor. The white is the back of the Tyvek. I just posted this for the awe factor. All the dark brown wood on the exterior WAS supporting corner posts and is now powder.

Edit, one of the sources I found shed a lot of light on it just in case others have questions. http://www.christianbuildinginspectors.com/index8c.htm
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-04-15, 03:35 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,517
Received 294 Votes on 261 Posts
Wow! you'd think they'd have realized there was a problem before the damage got that severe.
 
  #3  
Old 02-04-15, 04:10 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
There was not an inkling of problems other than the "weak" floor in one corner. Now, the original reason I was brought in was the rippling of the hardwood flooring, quickly determined to be non acclimation of the flooring prior to installation. They were going to have it resanded and finished. This obviously throws another light on it. I am amazed the corners of the house didn't sag, 'cause there ain't nothing holding it up except the porch rafters and box beams. This had to be leaking from the day the house was built probably 12 years ago.
 
  #4  
Old 02-04-15, 05:06 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 1,348
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
ran into a similar issue yesterday when replacing a bad door but it turned out to be ants instead of termites,,, proper drainage is always key,,, i don't see much difference between traditional hardcoat & eifs IF both are installed properly
 
  #5  
Old 02-05-15, 03:32 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
I think we found the point of infiltration. Where the first floor rafters and second floor meet, they put in an artsy fartsy cove joint. Naturally there was little foam for support at that juncture, so what stucco was there was left to expand and contract, and thus crack. All the water sheeting down from the gable end found its way to this joint, and everything below it was affected. With the EIFS, I understand it is so hard unless perimeter base drains are installed it will not breathe enough to dispel moisture/water. In addition, as per the article, there MUST be kick diverters to take waters into the gutters.
 
  #6  
Old 02-05-15, 06:06 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
What a mess! Will you be going back with more fake stucco or dressing it out differently?

I did a repair to an older house that had everything wrapped in aluminum. The porch consisted of wide open space with just one corner post and a duplicate on the other side of the stairs to attach a railing. The roof line was showing some sag. I removed a section of vented soffet enough to stick my camera up in the space and take a picture to see what was going on. There was nothing in there! The main horizontal beam was completely rotten away. If it wasn't for the fact that there was some support at the 4' mark where to roof passed over the main house (ranch) the whole roof would have collapsed. Most of the damage was right where the roof line make one of those stupid architectural jogs that changed the pitch to accommodate for the bump out of the porch. Lack of proper flashing by the roofers was the cause.
 
  #7  
Old 02-05-15, 01:13 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
I ain't doin' squat !! I'm just uncovering it all. I am letting other contractors bid on the job. The potential buyer is insisting a licensed contractor guarantee that the work they do is comprehensive to the entire house. No way would I put a license on the line guaranteeing something I haven't seen. The guys so far are suggesting a false relief column dressing for the corners, and one is suggesting a rock column dressing. A lot of work before any dressing goes on, however.

Makes you wonder just how much common sense goes into "design" of a house. Construction is simple, as long as designs don't get in the way.
 
  #8  
Old 02-05-15, 01:34 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
Exit - stage right-------->

Hmmmm, you repair someone else's work and then you have to guarantee the rest of the work done wrong against going wrong in the future...What could possibly be wrong with that?
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: