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Roof fascia, siding eave questions - repair before painting

Roof fascia, siding eave questions - repair before painting

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  #1  
Old 03-02-15, 07:09 AM
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Roof fascia, siding eave questions - repair before painting

Hey guys,

Got afew questions before I paint my house on woodwork... house (in South Florida) has not been painting in 11+ years. Main roof was replaced 8 years ago and house has 3 additions with flat roof that have not been repaired/replaced in approx 15+ years (maybe longer).

I has some known fascia issues I needed to repair first. But I also pressure washed the house, when I found some other issues. When I did this, the paint broke open in several areas to reveal pockets on the eaves. The ext of house is all concrete except wood eaves. (See Pic 1)

I want to do the job right (within reason, it was built in the 50's). So cleaned out all the pockets (wire wheel) and hand tested all the wood to find any others. What is the best method of repair for this now? By the way, I didnt find a single ant/insect in these. I think they are all OLD, the previous owner did tent (fumagate) the house afew years before we moved in (11yrs ago). I think these are old pockets that were just covered by paint?

For the beams, some areas look like I can just sand them down, like rounded off and leave them. Looks like previous owner did this in afew spots already. On the roof though, there are little "channels" which would make smooth sanding harder. Can I just fill with putty? If so, what Type/BRAND. Or should I just leave them as it and paint it? I already used a wire brush and got them "clean and smooth", just crater like. The deepest they go is about 3/16 inch, which is not even half the wood. The wood is still in great shape otherwise. By the way (Pic 1) is the worst one on the house, there several others, but 1/2 to 1/4 the total size).

Also, should I bother with re-caulking the joints? (see Pic 4) Am I foolish for thinking the new paint would be thick enough to cover it? Or is just not really an issue?

Final question... should I prime these areas before paint? Was thinking something like Kills? If so, what type/model?

Thanks for any insights/help,

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  #2  
Old 03-02-15, 07:17 AM
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I'll just address the painting aspects of your job.

You need to mix a bleach/water solution [40-50% bleach] and rewash the exterior to get rid of the mildew. Painting over mildew all but guarantees the mildew will come back sooner than it should! Chalk is a big problem in the fla sun. Any chalk that can't be washed off needs to be bound up with either an oil base coating or with Flood's EmulsaBond added to the first coat of latex paint.

While replacing damaged wood is best any filler you use needs to be formulated for exterior use. The 2 most commonly used fillers are bondo and exterior spackling.
 
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Old 03-02-15, 05:39 PM
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Thanks for the reply,

The dirt/mildew was easily twice as bad before the pressure wash... I was hesitant about doing another pressure wash for fear of destroying more wood. I like the 50% bleach scrub idea.

Concerning the wood filler... in your experience, using PIC 1 as a reference (because it the worst area I have) would you use bondo for that or filler/spackle for an area that size?

Also, on the new fascia I have installed (fresh wood) and these areas that I bondo/spackle... I assume primer is needed? What do you suggest?

Thanks for your insights,
 
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Old 03-03-15, 04:48 AM
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You don't have to use a PWer to clean the house. While I normally wet the house, apply the bleach/water solution with a pump up garden sprayer and rinse with my PWer - a garden hose is just as effective for rinsing.

I'm not crazy about using fillers on the exterior as sooner or later there is a chance they will fail. I prefer to replace, cut out a bad portion and fill with wood [dutchman] or just leave it as is. If I had to fill the backside of the fascia in pic #1, I'd make sure all the loose is removed, drill a few holes and use bondo.

An oil base primer is best for raw wood [and any fillers]. I normally use SWP's A-100 exterior oil base primer but other brands will also work. Latex primers don't seal the wood as well but should be adequate. The top coat needs to be latex [will adhere fine over oil primer]
 
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Old 03-03-15, 06:32 AM
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I agree with the dutchman on a big repair like that, especially when you need to form a sharp corner... got a Multimaster? Regarding oil primer that is "quick drying"... I've had a few painters tell me that they don't believe that quick drying primers have time to soak into the wood before they dry. (same as latex primers, they say) Don't know if there is any truth to that, but it makes sense. A standard oil primer might take up to a day to dry.
 
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Old 03-03-15, 06:53 AM
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X is correct, there is a difference between fast drying primers and what is sometimes referred to as a 'long' primer. A slower drying primer is preferred! All exterior oil base wood primers unless they state otherwise are long primers. The 2 things that make an oil base exterior wood primer better than a exterior latex primer is they seal better and the longer drying time allows them to develop a deeper bond with the substrate. They do take all day to dry and can take longer during cold damp conditions.
 
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