What am I looking at here for repair??

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Old 04-16-15, 09:05 PM
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What am I looking at here for repair??

Now that spring has come, its time for me to start an outdoor project or two. Or hire someone to do it.....

This is my first but definitely not my last. I love DIY projects for the house. The satisfaction of doing it yourself and doing it the way you want can't be beat.

I'm pretty handy with interior work of all kind but have never attempted outdoor work other than trim around windows.

I believe I have some stucco that has paint on it or something of that nature. The paint is now peeling and chipping away as is the paint on the wood trim. The house was built in 74 I believe and as far as I know, the exterior has never been redone. I could be wrong on that however. It is a tudor style house with ugly orange brick. The brick makes it tough to change to a vinyl siding. I also have grown adults come and tell me how when growing up they remember my house on that street the most, which is kind of cool.

Anyways, here are some pictures. What needs to be done as I have never tackled an outdoor project like this. Does it consist of stripping it all down and repainting? Is this a job for the pros? Ballpark, what would something like this cost (impossible to estimate I know).

The stucco pictures are of the peeling. The wood pictures are of the peeling and splitting on the corner. The brick is just to show the ugly brick color.....even after a good power wash!!

Oh and Christmas lights are coming down this weekend!!

Thanks,
Peja
 
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Old 04-16-15, 09:09 PM
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And the pictures continued...
 
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Old 04-17-15, 05:20 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

First you need to remove all the peeling paint. Scraping works best on the wood and a pressure washer is better for the stucco but it can be scraped and/or wire brushed instead. Any raw wood will need a wood primer. Stucco can be primed with the same primer, a masonry primer or even the finish paint thinned down about 10% Often the paint on the stucco will become chalky. Paint will not adhere long term to chalk! When it's not feasible to remove all the chalk you need to add Flood's EmulsaBond to the 1st coat of latex paint. EB can also be used with latex wood primer.
 
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Old 04-17-15, 05:57 AM
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That roof where gutter is in the last picture should have had a kick out so water would not be running down the wall like that.
https://www.google.com/search?q=gutt...ng%3B480%3B270
 
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Old 04-17-15, 08:57 AM
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Great information guys....thank you very much.

I will definitely be purchasing a kickout for the part of the gutters as needed Joe.

Mark -

So you are saying I can pressure wash / scrape the peeling parts of the stucco but the parts that the stucco is still in tact I shouldn't have to worry about that?

Once I prime and then go over the bare stucco part with 2 coats of paint, will I not see the outline of where the bare part was to the old stuff? Not sure how to explain it but different elevations?

Will the wood be the same scenario? Do I not have to remove all the paint first if its not in distress?

I assume when I prime/paint, I should do the whole section that I am doing since the paint probably won't match up to the original?

Thanks again for the advice!!
 
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Old 04-17-15, 10:00 AM
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I don't believe the stucco is deteriorating or peeling but rather the coating applied over it has failed. It will be difficult to completely eliminate the transistion from the peeled paint to the sound paint - that is part of the price paid for it not having been repainted years ago. I expect the biggest issue with the existing well adhered paint will be chalk [the dry milky white stuff that will get on your fingers when you touch the old paint] I'd repaint the entire house, you'd have to at least repaint whole sections .... it's too far gone to expect touch up to look good.

Most scrape, prime and repaint the wood. If you want to completely eliminate the transistion from scraped to sound you can sand it smooth. Most don't want to go to that much trouble [or pay the painter extra to do it]
 
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Old 04-17-15, 11:42 AM
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Great....I appreciate the help.

So tell me if this is a good plan of attack.

I power wash the loose paint and make sure there isn't any more flaking. I then prime the whole section with a masonary primer or the same wood primer that I used for the wood. I then repaint the entire section. I then do this for the entire house since I will need to match the paint and it is in probably need of one.

Now will the pressure wash take care of the chalk if I pressure wash lightly the paint that is still sound? Or will the primer seal it?

And I will just have to live with the transitions? I guess since it is outside it won't be as noticeable.



THEN, for the wood, I need to scrape the existing loose paint off and then prime at the very least the exposed wood. Then repaint all of the wood and still deal with the transitions.


Does this seem correct? Anything I am missing? It doesn't sound hard and seems like something I should be able to do. If it will save me thousands doing it myself it is probably worth it.

Thanks.
 
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Old 04-17-15, 12:44 PM
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I doubt pressure washing alone will remove the chalk. You'd want to apply a cleaner to it first, let is set/work and then rinse. I'd use TSP, you can add bleach if you have any mildew to remove. It's best to wash anything on the exterior that you plan to paint.
 
 

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