how can i identify wood siding?

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Old 04-29-15, 09:55 PM
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how can i identify wood siding?

I need to replace some siding,so i need to know what it is.
Is there a website or something that can help me?
Or should i just post pics here?
I know it is not asbestos, fiber, composite. Guessing it is not cedar, no smell. Looks like just pine. Do they make them in just pine?
In some spots, the paint has peeled off, but the siding does not appear damaged. Is there a non cedar, wood, weatherproof shingle?
They are machine cut, uniform size.
House is in CT. Built in 1965.
Thanks
 
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Old 04-30-15, 04:11 AM
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Yeah, posting pictures of several angles will help. Maybe we can identify it for you.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 04:30 AM
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A lot of the houses built around here at that time used siding made from poplar. I suspect the biggest issue you'll have is finding an exact match as styles/dimensions change some over the years. How much siding do you need to replace? just one area or scattered around the house? Look forward to seeing the pics.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 05:12 AM
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The list of most readily commercially available around that time would be white pine, spruce, eastern white cedar, western red cedar, white fir, redwood,cypress and I'm sure a few others of a more regional nature such as marksr suggested with the poplar.

One hint to narrow the field might be to look at the "cut" of the wood. If it is showing a vertical or edge grain, meaning a series of lines representing the growth rings, then it is likely more the western cedar, redwood or fir. Not having a particularly noticeable odor doesn't mean it's not cedar as I have seen a lot of examples that did not really retain the odor after a long time unless you were cutting into it.

A picture would certainly help but you might want to stop by at an old lumber yard in your area and ask what may have been the most readily available wood used in that era.

You don't necessarily have to use the same species as the original but buying an upper grade of whatever wood you use is a wise move.

Your post is a little confusing, is the siding a shingle or a horizontal lap siding? If it is shingle style then in your area I would be inclined to think it is eastern white cedar.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 10:47 AM
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here are some photos.
I need to replace about 10' on a 40' wall due to a roof leak that got behind the wall and rotted the wall.
I can pull the rotted shingles off the house and break them. I do not smell cedar, or anything else.
thanks
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Old 04-30-15, 10:53 AM
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How about a picture of the wall so we can see some undamaged siding.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 11:06 AM
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that photo is the shingle off the house, back side of shingle.


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front side of shingle

Attachment 49994

part that was not rotted.

Attachment 49997

part that was not rotted, again.

Attachment 49998

not rotted, paint peeled

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not rotted, paint peeled
 
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Old 04-30-15, 11:09 AM
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oops, messed up a few of them.
let me try again
 
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Old 04-30-15, 11:14 AM
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part that was not rotted

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part that was not rotted, again

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paint peeled, but not rotted
 
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Old 04-30-15, 11:17 AM
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switch caption for first and last photos.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 11:22 AM
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ok. thats the photos.
let me know if you need any more photos or info.

my grandfather built this house. he loved to use the cheapest obsolete stuff he could find. everything is mismatched.
so, god only knows what this could be.
what was popular in this area at that time does not help, as he would use boards from a 100 year old outhouse, if he could.
anything that was not popular and did not sell, he bought.

thanks.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 12:10 PM
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As long as the thickness is close most any wood shingle will work. When using cedar it's best to oil prime the front/back and edges to prevent tannin bleed.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 02:47 PM
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You have a few issues to contend with.

As marksr stated, priming the entire shingle is the only proper way to go. In reality, I would apply a coat of finish paint over the primer before installing them.

The original installation seems to not have allowed for expansion in the shingles. They should be spaced 1/4" to 3/8" apart to allow for proper expansion and contraction. That spacing also provides an air gap to assist in drying. No shingle should be spaced within 1-1/2" of an underlying joint and allowing more space is obviously better.

The one picture showing the back of a rotting shingle looks like western red cedar but tough to say without a better look.

I think the issues of not having primer on the entire shingle and not leaving a gap between shingles are the main problems with the failure you have. I'm not sure that the originals were ever primed.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 03:41 PM
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Sounds like we had the same grandpa... LOL

IMO, what it originally was us besides the point. To echo Calvert,

You don't necessarily have to use the same species as the original but buying an upper grade of whatever wood you use is a wise move.
I would just get some wood shingles, whatever is available, as long as they are the same thickness they will blend in just fine once painted. Unless you want them to be cupped like the old ones are.

The original shingles are surely from old growth trees which just aren't being milled anymore. So IMO all you should care about is the thickness of the butt end of the shingle. As long as it's fairly close, the species of wood won't matter all that much.

FWIW, it almost looks like a "hardwood" that might be common to the area you live in. Probably made by some mill in the area that closed down 50 yrs ago. If the shingles are tapered, they are almost certainly cedar or a type of pine/fir. If they are not tapered, it's anyone's guess.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 04:52 PM
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Once you have removed all the old shingles, split them 1 1/2" wide, bundle them up and sell them as shims. If the paint is a lead based paint maybe not, but I'd use painted shingles as shims any day.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 05:13 PM
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Thanks everyone.
I thought it would be a lot harder to find shingles that would match.
As for what caused the rot, it was the leak in the roof. I took out the interior sheetrock and the studs are missing about 2' at the top and 2' at the bottom. Middle is just hanging there.
I am fixing the wall now, then the siding. Roof was fixed last year.

Thanks for the suggestion on selling the shingles as shims.
 
 

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