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Should I pull, reflash and reinstall windows when installing vinyl siding?

Should I pull, reflash and reinstall windows when installing vinyl siding?

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Old 05-16-15, 09:47 PM
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Question Should I pull, reflash and reinstall windows when installing vinyl siding?

I plan to reside with vinyl siding after removing Masonite. Will install Tyvek WRB. Should I pull and reflash windows?

Existing Masonite is in bad shape. Sheathing is 1/2 inch Celotex fiberboard. Probably no existing weather-resistant barrier, so plan to install Tyvek DrainWrap. Highly suspect window flashing will not have been done right - at least not close to current Tyvek Flashing System Installation Guide or Water-Resistive Barriers Guidelines. House is 23 Years old. So, I want to improve the flashing so that after spending $$ on vinyl siding, I don't have water/rot problems in the future. I don't want a false sense of security. Should I pull, reflash and then reinstall the existing windows? Or do some kind of flashing "work-around"? I don't trust just wrapping existing trim in aluminum coil trim. Or purchase new, vinyl or replacement windows? Have limited budget, but want to do it right due to significant investment. Thanks for your help!
 
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Old 05-16-15, 10:40 PM
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No, disturbing the windows would likely be opening a big can of worms. If you are not currently in a position to replace the windows, I would bring the Tyvek up to within an inch or so of the window, then use a 4" peel and stick window flashing tape to seal all 4 sides of the window to the WRB. Then apply your new window trim, then apply the siding.
 
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Old 05-17-15, 07:02 AM
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Are your current windows installed with nailing flanges? Do they incorporate j channel in their design (highly unlikely). Pictures of a window or two would certainly help. What XSleeper said is spot on with the window tape and cutting the Tyvek short of the window. I would make sure the top flashing is in good order and extending enough over the edge of the window trim for proper drainage.
 
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Old 05-17-15, 07:16 AM
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If the trims going to be wrapped it's simple enough to add a few inches to form a flange that sits against the wall.
I do the trim wrapping first then add the house wrap and window and door tape over the flange.
 
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Old 05-17-15, 04:13 PM
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Thank you XSleeper, Chandler and Joecaption! I'm not sure if my windows have nailing flanges or incorporate j-channel in their design, but have attached some pictures that I hope will be helpful. A related question - from a maintenance standpoint, is it be preferable to use poly materials such as Azek #908 brickmould for window trim, or wrap existing wood trim with trim coil, and is there a big cost differential? Thanks again! Name:  DSCN3407 (4).jpg
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Old 05-17-15, 04:24 PM
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Your windows do not have a nailing fin. You definitely do not want to remove them. If you want to make the windows low-maintenance, you would clad the sills and brickmould with aluminum trim coil as Joe mentioned. (adding PVC brickmould doesn't address the sills, which would still need to be clad... so why not clad all of it.) I would probably not put flashing tape around these windows since they do not have the nailing flange, but would probably do it similar to the way Joe suggested, but I would apply the Tyvek first and then wrap the windows. The flange he speaks of would overlap the WRB "like a nailing fin" and could then be taped. (use the regular Tyvek seam tape) The top flange should be under the Tyvek or a drip cap should be added to flash the top under the WRB.

Since you are putting on vinyl, I would not waste my money on drain wrap. Use the standard Tyvek Homewrap. Drain wrap would work well with stucco or cedar siding.

The PVC #908 brickmould is about $1 to $1.50 lin/ft. Plus labor to install it. If you go with aluminum cladding, it may cost around $50 each to have your windows clad with trim coil. That's what most in our area charge. May be higher or lower in your area.
 
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Old 05-17-15, 04:29 PM
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If it was mine I'd remove those old post to hold the screens in place under cut the jambs and window tracks with a sawsall and install the coil stock all the way up to the stool.
If the installer has a brake buddy they can bend the coil in one pass on a break to metal to the shape of the brick molding.
 
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Old 05-24-15, 06:18 AM
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Thank you all again! Could you give me any more input as to the details of making and applying the "flanges"? Here's what I've come up with, but I am new to this, so further advice will definitely be appreciated:

i) When cutting and bending the coil stock to wrap the window trim, add 8 more inches width to each piece to create a seamless flange that will sit against the sheathing, to serve as flashing. Integrate this flange with the Tyvek WRB. This might be done as follows:
(1) Install the sill trim wrap/integrated metal flashing first. Do not apply Tyvek tape to the bottom of this flange (or skip tape) at the bottom.
(2) Make a diagonal cut in the Tyvek at the top corners of the window. Temporarily tape the Tyvek up out of the way.
(3) Jamb flanges should start at least one inch above the top of the upper rough opening, and extend at least three inches below the bottom of the rough opening. Nail the jamb trim wrap/integrated metal flashings so they overlap the sill flashing. Apply Tyvek Tape to the outer edges of the jamb flashing.
(4) The Head Flange should extend out 2 inches on both sides of the jamb flange. Install the head flange under the flap cut in the Tyvek, and lap it over the jamb flanges. Apply Tyvek Tape to the top of the flange and the sheathing, then over the diagonal cuts in the housewrap, and “skip tape” the bottom of the Tyvek flap.
(5) Install metal z-flashing or a vinyl drip cap over the head trim.

I'm proposing the 8-inch width to help prevent horizontal or vertical wind-driven rain from getting to the sheathing. Other than that, my thinking is to mimic the Tyvek instructions for flashing a non-finned, pre-installed window as much as possible.

One further question is would it be beneficial to use Tyvek Straight Flash on the flange edges, then tape, as an additional protection against ultimate tape failure?

If I'm "all wet," on this, don't hesitate to say so (I'd rather be dry later). Thank you so much!
 
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Old 05-24-15, 07:06 AM
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Sounds okay. I would not trust the Tyvek seam tape to tape anything to your existing sheathing, so in that respect, the Straight flash would probably be superior, assuming your sheathing is clean.

Don't forget that your j-channel is going to poke holes in your metal flashing and WRB when you nail it on, so getting crazy with the length of the flange is in some ways pointless. A 1" - 1 1/2" flange that is taped to the WRB is IMO sufficient.

When the time comes to install the j-channel and siding, this dude has some pretty good pointers. Not the best organized page, a lot of information and pictures though. I probably don't get as fanatical as he does, but his ideas are good. Keep in mind he is showing practices for various kinds of siding... not just vinyl.

In short, water runs down the side j-channels of a window and at the bottom corners of the window, much of that water goes right behind the siding. (key thing to remember is that vinyl siding is not waterproof!) So water will be running down the WRB until it gets to the the bottom of the WRB and drips out. But you can help direct that water back out ASAP by doing a few simple things.

Easiest way to explain it would be to look at this link... http://www.vinylsiding.org/wp-conten...al_English.pdf

Then look at the diverter flashing in Figure 44. Before I install the j-channels in Figure 43, I cut a square corner out of a diverter flashing and tuck that behind the j-channels, letting it lay on the siding below as is pictured in Figure 44. That way when water gets behind the siding at that bottom corner, it is directed back out to the weep holes asap.

As you look at the albert roofing photos, keep that concept in mind. Here is another photo of a similar technique.

Houses with no WRB will look like this after a short time. WRB will prevent that, but adding additional flashing to protect the WRB will help even further. It's especially helpful in preventing leaks when you have a 2 story house with windows one above the other.
 
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Old 05-24-15, 09:45 AM
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Thank you, X Sleeper! I greatly appreciate and will incorporate all these details. I do have another question about soffits, if it's OK to ask here. I have existing soffits that appear to be made out of Masonite or similar clap board material, with a continuous aluminum vent strip. The soffit on a portion over my garage has pulled away, so needs to be replaced. I am considering Invisivent vinyl soffits (will also have a ridge vent installed to work in conjunction with the soffit vents). I have read that OSB soffits withstand high winds much better than vinyl, which we occasionally do have in Richmond, VA when hurricanes come inland. So I want to avoid potential soffit blow-offs and consequent wind-driven rain in the attic. My questions are: (1) if the soffit material is in good shape elsewhere, should I leave it for the protection it provides, and install the Invisivent vinyl soffit over (on the bottom side) of it? Or (2) should I tear it all out and just install the vinyl soffit (less than 12-inch wide), perhaps to a horizontal nailer at the wall and then to the fascia board, and (3) one contractor recommended removing the aluminum vent in the existing soffit first before installing the new vinyl soffit, to improve ventilation/air flow to the attic - is this advisable, and would it let bugs and/or wind-driven rain in? Another contractor has recommended drilling holes periodically in the existing soffit (presumably with vent caps) to increase ventilation if/as needed. Any thoughts on this? And (4) Is it advisable to put a wire mesh or screen above the Invisivent to help keep bugs out? And lastly, is there any kind of a baffle or diverter that is/could be used in conjunction with the soffit vents to reduce any potential wind-driven rain from being driven or sucked into the attic? Thank you again for any help you might be able to provide!
 
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