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Best way to remove masonite/plywood siding held in place with staples?

Best way to remove masonite/plywood siding held in place with staples?

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  #1  
Old 06-16-15, 06:25 PM
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Best way to remove masonite/plywood siding held in place with staples?

I'm replacing some water damaged siding - is there a quicker, easier way to remove the staples then digging them out with a screwdriver or the like?

Thanks.

Pic of the siding in question.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0z...ew?usp=sharing
 
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  #2  
Old 06-16-15, 06:28 PM
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Take a skilsaw, set it so it cuts about 1/2" deep and make vertical cuts in the siding every 12 or 16" on center. then yank the siding off. If you're lucky some of the staples will come with it.
 
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Old 06-16-15, 06:47 PM
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Take a skilsaw, set it so it cuts about 1/2" deep and make vertical cuts in the siding every 12 or 16" on center. then yank the siding off. If you're lucky some of the staples will come with it.
Thanks. What do you do at the top and bottom where you can't complete the cut with the saw?
 
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Old 06-16-15, 07:41 PM
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I think you will find that the siding will break fairly easily at the thin RB&B grooves since it is only about 5/16" thick there. Once you cut a few slices in it, it will pry right off... whatever is left will then be easier to loosen. You can also cut with the slope of the roof close to the soffit. The little pieces that are left won't have many nails, and will come off in 4ft chunks.
 
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Old 06-17-15, 04:48 AM
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I think you will find that the siding will break fairly easily at the thin RB&B grooves
RB&B stands for....?

.................................
 
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Old 06-17-15, 05:49 AM
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Reverse board and batten. It is the design made by manufacturers to replicate vertical boards with narrower boards placed over the seams at 8" on center, but in reverse.
 
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Old 06-17-15, 06:01 AM
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What's the plan once it's removed?
Reason I ask is what you have there now was installed wrong and there's a simple fix.
It never should have been installed flush with the stucco, and just count on caulking to seal it.
That gable wall should have been sitting out far enough that the siding or sheathing could run past the stucco by about an inch.
Easy to add 1X's to space the studs out enough to make that happen.
 
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Old 06-17-15, 01:34 PM
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What's the plan once it's removed?
Replacement.

Thanks for the tip.

What the guy at Home Depot suggested is that there should be a galvanized drip rail/flashing between the bottom of the siding and the stucco. Should that work in lieu of offsetting it? Or do you think he's not correct?
 
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Old 06-17-15, 02:03 PM
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That's called Z molding.
It would still a be a weak spot to allow water to sit and wick up the sheathing.
Once again what do you plan on replacing the old siding with?
 
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Old 06-17-15, 02:10 PM
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Once again what do you plan on replacing the old siding with?
Haven't settled on a material yet, what's up there now is okay in places where water intrusion wasn't an issue.

There was some stuff at Home Depot with a 50 year guarantee. Don't recall what it's called.

What do you recommend?
 
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