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Vinyl Siding Nails - Gauge/Dimension of Ring Shank Shaft

Vinyl Siding Nails - Gauge/Dimension of Ring Shank Shaft

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Old 08-11-15, 07:39 AM
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Vinyl Siding Nails - Gauge/Dimension of Ring Shank Shaft

I am planning to have extended-length vinyl siding installed, and need guidance on the appropriate gauge/dimension for the nail shaft. I believe the nail slots are 5/32 inch by 3/4 or 1-inch in dimension, and I don't want the gauge/diameter of the nail to be so thick that it might inhibit the movement of the siding when it expands or contracts I know not to nail the head snug, but my question is whether a too-thick diameter nail in the nail slot might also bind-up the siding). To achieve the highest advertised wind resistance rating (full-double nailing hem), the manufacturer specifies the use of ring shank nails. I want to use aluminum ring-shank nails to also avoid corrosion. I have found a 2-inch Maze aluminum ring shank vinyl siding nail with a .438 inch (7/16-inch head), which I think will provide good holding power, but it has a 9-gauge shaft, which I think is equivalent to a .1483 inch, or 4.75/32 inch dimension. I am concerned since the nail slot is only 5/32 inch tall, as to whether the 4.75/32 inch nail shaft might be too thick, and impede proper movement of the siding (I want to avoid "oil-canning"). Unfortunately, I've not been able to locate a 10 gauge (.135 inch) or an 11 gauge (.1205 inch) shaft on a 2-inch aluminum ring shanked vinyl siding (roofing) nail. Do you think I'll be OK with the 9-gauge nail, and if not, do you know of a brand/provider of 2-inch aluminum ring shank nails with at minimum 3/8 inch head in a 10 or 11 gauge shaft diameter? Any other concerns/input? Thank you!
 
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Old 08-11-15, 08:45 AM
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I've always used galvanized roofing nails. What are you nailing into? Aluminum nails may not corrode but they can be a real bugger to drive into harder surfaces because they bend so easily.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 09:05 AM
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The nails will be driven into 1/2 inch Celotex fiberboard sheathing over standard 2 x 4 studs, probably spruce, Douglas fir or southern yellow pine. House was built in 1993. Thanks!
 
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Old 08-11-15, 10:06 AM
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Way over thinking this.
Regular roofing nails will work fine.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 10:17 AM
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Another vote for hot dipped galvanized roofing nails. The size of shank is fine and the head helps hold the siding on if the wind tugs at it.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 10:49 AM
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http://www.icc-es.org/Reports/pdf_files/ESR-1133.pdf Great - thanks guys! Of interest (to me at least), it seems that nearly all manufacturers advertise better wind ratings from the double hemmed vinyl siding, but they don't tell you that the nails must be ring shanked in order to achieve that rating/result - you have to find that our for yourself, and it's not easy. So I expect significant numbers of consumers have purchased the double hemmed products, but don't actually have the blow-off protection they think they do. Also, many installers use electro-galvanized nails, that the literature says can be subject to fairly rapid corrosion, and then potential blow-offs. These are the reasons I'm trying to find a ring-shanked, more corrosion-resistant nail. Unfortunately, stainless steel nails are very expensive, and aluminum may bend too easy... guess that leaves me with the double-hot dipped galvanized nails . Glad to know the 9-gauge shank diameter won't be a problem. Thank you all so much!
 
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Old 08-11-15, 01:24 PM
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I don't think I have ever seen ring shank hot dipped nails. I suspect the heavy coating fills in the grooves negating the benefit. Luckily in Richmond you are in a lower wind zone than the coast so you don't have as great a risk of high winds.
 
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Old 08-11-15, 02:12 PM
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The siding will virtually blow off the heads and into the next state before the roofing nail will come out. Again, too much effort on such as small part of the picture. We do this all the time and have never had failures due to nails pulling out. NOW, you mentioned Celotex, you will need to use at least 1 1/4" nails so that most of the nail will be in the stud. Celotex itself is not a nailing surface. Be sure not to nail them too tightly as the siding must move, thus the slots. Binding the siding will cause ripples.
 
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