Used wrong wood shed siding materials


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Old 08-12-15, 07:48 AM
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Used wrong wood shed siding materials

Over the weekend I put up a lean-to wood shed in the backyard.

About 10' wide, 4' deep, and 6' tall.

I have done all the framing with #2 PT lumber, except the roof rafters I used regular 2X4.

Then for the walls and doors I made them out of 3/4" plywood.

My intention was to use pressure treated plywood.

It didn't happen. I was at the big box store and rolled the cart up, and bought 8 sheets of what I thought was pressure treated plywood (it looked like it was pressure treated with a darker tint).

After I put everything up, I was going through my receipts and noticed it says "23/32 RTD SHEATHING PLYWOOD".

Sheathing? That's for underlayment right? I think using it for the shed's roof deck is OK since it would be covered. But the walls and doors...oh boy.

Here is the link to the plywood I bought:

23/32 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. RTD Sheathing Syp-166103 - The Home Depot

23/32 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. RTD Sheathing Syp

I think I used the wrong kind right? Any advise? Do I need to waterproof it somehow, or paint something on it?

Location is Miami, Florida, hot, humid, rains everyday in the summer.



 
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Old 08-12-15, 08:04 AM
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How close is it to the ground?
 
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Old 08-12-15, 08:04 AM
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If you plan to put siding and trim on over it, it won't be a big deal. If you weren't, then yeah you will have to prime and paint it. The bottom edges won't fare well being that close to the ground.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 08:23 AM
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"How close is it to the ground?"

If you look at the first picture where I showed there is a piece of 4X4 at the bottom which is about two inches off the ground at the nearest point. The plywood are attached to be flushed to the bottom of that 4X4. The three front posts are PT 4X4 set about 3' into the ground, coated with roofing tar at the feet with concrete around them.

So the plywood will not touch the ground but will be subjected to rain.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 08:26 AM
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Can I stain it? Or use these things called Thompson water sealer?
 
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Old 08-12-15, 08:27 AM
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Yeah, sorry, didn't see the pics the first time I looked at the thread, maybe my browser didn't load them or something....

Regardless, as X has already pointed out, this is going to be problematic and you should prime and paint all six sides of the wood.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 08:44 AM
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Any form of plywood should not be within 6" of any grade or it's going to rot.
Pressure treated plywood would have been my last choice for siding.
If you wanted plywood the right way would have been to first install 1 X 6 vinyl lumber at the bottom, Z molding, then something like Smart Board or T-111.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 09:37 AM
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I wouldn't bother with TWS but priming with an exterior oil base primer with latex house paint for the top coat should do ok. The biggest trick will be getting the bottom edge of the plywood primed/painted.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 09:42 AM
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Sorry, didn't read the whole question the first time - I'm with Mark that I wouldn't even consider Thompsons. A deck stain might be ok but it's plywood so I think paint is going to be the better choice for aesthetics.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 09:51 AM
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Primer and paint will do a better job of protecting the plys from moisture. A solid stain might look ok but paint would be better. Also if there are any ink stamps on the plywood the oil primer will seal them.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 10:04 AM
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If that door is a just a piece of plywood it will probably warp. Best to have it attached to a 2x4 frame.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 11:05 AM
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Good catch Ray, it needs a framework of 1xs at a minimum. I'd be shocked if it doesn't warp without a framework to stiffen it up.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 05:41 PM
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There is a frame of 1x6 around the doors on the inside.

I originally wanted to use T1-11, but when I picked one up it was already warped and looks very thin. So I opted for 3/4" plywood.
 

Last edited by MiamiCuse; 08-12-15 at 06:08 PM.
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Old 08-13-15, 03:25 AM
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Glad you have stiffeners on the inside of the door. It might also be a good idea to place one diagonally.
If I'm not mistaken there are 2 different T-111 panels, 1 is only 3/8" thick but the other is 5/8"
 
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Old 08-13-15, 04:42 AM
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If I'm not mistaken there are 2 different T-111 panels, 1 is only 3/8" thick but the other is 5/8"
That is correct. .
 
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Old 08-14-15, 05:45 AM
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"priming with an exterior oil base primer with latex house paint for the top coat should do ok. "

marksr, is there a big difference between oil based and water based primer? Would using something like BM Fresh Start be OK or oil based primer is far superior?
 
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Old 08-14-15, 09:11 AM
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As a general rule, you always want to use oil based primer on bare wood. Latex primer is not as good at sealing the surface.
 
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Old 08-14-15, 09:25 AM
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While both bond ok to the wood, oil base will seal the wood better including any stains that might bleed thru the latex. Since the wood is so close to the ground I would highly recommend oil base primer over latex.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 05:18 AM
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OK thanks marksr. I will go with oil based primer then latex paint.
 
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Old 09-07-15, 05:08 AM
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Its gonna be okay

So there is a copper based liquid sold by special order from home depot and other stores. The copper prevents the organic rot that we get with the heat and moisture. A product such as this or one similiar is useful, and good for future maintenance.

http://www.worldpaintsupply.com/rust...-preservative/

The biggest problem you will have is splash. You can wait for a rain and look to see how high the splash is up the wall. The clean stone has nothing to offer dirt or marking line wise, so perhaps some blue chalk or other self removing powder would serve to find this line. The idea is, as much as one wants to believe it wont happen, that microscopic cracks in older paint skins caused by heating cooling and oxidation of the wood will allow moisture resulting in failure. Such that the copper layer awaits what gets through this cracks is to stop fungi and rot, there is a physical abrasion caused by water splash, especially caused when it picks up mineral grit from the stone. To that end, a lower outside trimboard base of something like LP smartsiding would help, though whatever is used should be capped and also installed using spacers from the stone such that it doesnt not touch and can dry occasionally.

The doors will probably warp unless you laminate them with another layer of panel. Think of it as a thin box where the torsion forces of the shrinking aging outside panel and sticks are resisted by the interior panel going the other direction forcewise. The interior material should probably be at least exposure 1, which is to mean that the glue is waterproof, though the organic wood is not. Some thin treated plywood like 3/8 would be better over the years. Treat the inside with the copper before closing it up.

This should make it last a long time, but paint film maintenance will be required every decade or so. I hope this helps.
 
 

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