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Woven corners w/Hardie plank; any tips on speeding up the process

Woven corners w/Hardie plank; any tips on speeding up the process

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  #1  
Old 08-13-15, 09:10 PM
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Question Woven corners w/Hardie plank; any tips on speeding up the process

I know, I'm crazy for doing woven corners with Hardie plank, but I really want that look.
I expected it to be slower than if I had used straight cuts against trim, but I have to believe there must be a better way to measure than what I'm doing.
I've tried using a T-Bevel, but that was not as accurate as temporarily putting the plank in place (I use "Solo Siders" to hold it there). Then I mark where the cut needs to be.
The most difficult, and time consuming, are the inside corners where the (as yet uncut) plank is longer than the section of wall that I'm covering (for example, between a window and an inside corner)
With the inside corner cut, the edge that goes into the corner is angled, so the bottom edge of the plank is shorter than the top edge of the plank (by around 1/2"). I've tried using those measurements, but they still are not as accurate as placing the plank in place and then marking the cut.

I welcome any ideas that could help save time and waste.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 08-15-15, 06:08 AM
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I think that any "jig" type approach you, or others, may come up with is still going to be subject to minor variations due to the nature of framing and sheathing materials and installations.

The best I could think of would be a sled type approach as is fabricated by many installers of vinyl siding. This would pretty much mandate that you use a circular saw with diamond blade for cutting the siding. You could set up the sled so that the angle that is most representative of the situation you encounter is used in the sled assembly. Any slight variation you would have in how pieces fit together would be taken care of by bedding the material in an elastomeric caulking material. Of course all cuts should be primed before assembly.
 
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Old 08-15-15, 06:10 AM
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T-Bevel

Use one of these to measure the angle and transfer to your stock:

Johnson T-Bevel-B75 - The Home Depot
 
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Old 08-15-15, 08:44 AM
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Thanks for your ideas Calvert and Wirepuller38.

Calvert, I understand about the jig. I made and used one for soffit material and it worked great. They were all straight cuts though. I don't know how I'd create a jig for angle cuts that keep varying by one or two degrees.
I'm using BulletTools' EZ Shear for most of the cuts. No dust! I still have to use the circular saw for the lengthwise cuts though. EZ Shear's have a fixture that will hold the stock in varying angles. I didn't buy it with the shear. Maybe I should. Even with it though, I'm still faced with the challenge of transferring the angle from the corner of the wall to the cutting device.
I love the elastomeric caulk idea except that the manufacturer (James Hardie) says not to use it with the pre-finished planks (which I have).

Wirepuller, I have a bevel just like the one you linked to. Maybe I didn't give that a fair shake. I'll give it another shot.

Thanks again.
 
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