Hardie install questions

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Old 08-15-15, 07:23 PM
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Hardie install questions

Good day to you all. I am looking at installing Hardie for the first time on my house. I've looked at the vids etc and talked to several people about installing it and a few questions still come up that havent been answered. any help would be appreciated in advanced, thank you.


1. Installing The hardie cement siding with vinyl trim; j-trim, undersil,drip try and corners.

-as you are caulking it with the cement board trims why can you not use vinyl trims and caulk inside with them as well? this way you wouldnt need to necessarily make every cut end perfect, and if its packed with caulking; nor would you need edge treatment.

2. joint flashing. metal? rubber? tar paper? tyvek? all seem viable candidates to me; thought?

3. Cement block foundation installation methods. most people I have talked to say screws. but the requirements for the siding seem a little much and might turn my above grade foundation into swiss cheese.


Thanks again.
 
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Old 08-15-15, 07:58 PM
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Welcome to the forums! Xsleeper will chime in and give good advice, so hang in there.

1). No. Install hardieplank using standard corner boards, such as 5/4 Miratec or cement boards.
2) You will have Tyvek covering the entire wall so some choose to use 15 lb felt strips that extend under the piece above the joint and down through it.
3). I have never and will probably never install it on a concrete foundation directly. Why would you do that?
 
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Old 08-16-15, 06:51 AM
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Did you down load the install directions on the Hardee website yet?
They suggest using strips of Tar paper under the seam with no caulking.
Post a picture where you think you need to cover the foundation. Only way I would do it is over some form of sheathing.
No close up needed!
No way would I screw Hardee plank, you would have to predrill and counter sink every panel or it's going to crack or the screw heads going to not sit flush.
I stopped using Hardee trim long ago, at least 1/2 the time it gets damaged before it's even installed or when nailing it up. I use 5/4 vinyl instead.
If you can afford it a real siding supplyer should have outside corners that are all one piece making it seamless and looks a whole lot better.
Invest in a real siding nail gun, it shoots long small gauge ring shanked nails, makes the job go much faster and the heads will sit flush.
 
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Old 08-16-15, 02:31 PM
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Well I don't have much to add... but anyone who puts hardie in vinyl corners and j-channel should be shot. And maybe forced to write the hardie installation instructions by hand 100 times.

For joint flashing I have used doubled pieces of tyvek, sheetmetal squares, painted trim coil and felt paper. Felt paper is black so that works good. As mentioned, no caulk on butt joints.

As for going over a foundation, I prefer to strip the wall (rainscreen style) and the hardieboard cement board screws work just fine. If no rainscreen furring can be used I would still drape a wrb over the cement. But generally you need to fur the cement out to meet the sheathing.

I'm not a big fan of the hardie trim either but when I do use it I put it on with a framing gun, a flush drive adapter and exterior nails.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 05:19 PM
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So why do you not use vinyl trim? The Hardie trim is big and gawdy, and fragile. I lost two pieces on delivery. Ntm you have to be precise with your board cuts. With vinyl you have fudge room. You chalk anyways but it's hidden in vinyl. You could put a weather strip foam in as well to help keep out water. It's done on tin all the time. As long as it is water proof it should be fine.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 05:29 PM
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I think you are missing the point, hoss. Vinyl trim is for vinyl siding. Dimension lumber, whether it is made of concrete, Miratec, wood, or PVC is what you want. Sure you have to be precise with your cuts. That's what makes it look good. Vinyl trim will contain the thickness of vinyl siding. I doubt it will contain lapped Hardie. It might. But it will look pure goofy.
 
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Old 08-19-15, 05:49 PM
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1 1/4" channel would be plenty for 2 boards. 4" trim wouldn't look goofy.


http://www.kaycan.com/fr/wp-content/...uct-beaded.jpg

How does this look goofy.
This is vinyl, but the profile of the siding would be the same. These are 6" panels. 8" reveal on Hardie wouldn't look much different.

So I ask again why not use vinyl trim?
 
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Old 08-19-15, 06:54 PM
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Badgerai. I don't know why you are asking, because it sounds like you are going to do what you want anyway. If you want to ignore the James Hardie instructions and do it your own way, you go right ahead, just leave us out of it. You will probably pump 100 tube of caulk into those j-channels by the time you're done. And if you ever get any hail there you will be crying when the vinyl breaks and now you can't get the nails out without removing all the siding. Bad idea, but what do we know... just a few professionals here with the combined experience of a few hundred years.

Vinyl siding doesn't get caulked into the j-channels and it expands and contracts. Water can also freely get behind and drains out. That's the difference.
 
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Old 08-20-15, 04:21 AM
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Ntm you have to be precise with your board cuts
I have to laugh (sorry, late to the game) that you are planning on siding a home yet don't have the skill set to cut a board to length. Possible that you are getting in over your head? Just playing devils advocate.

I think that XSleeper hit it on the head. As a remodeler myself, If (and when) repairs are needed, access to the area in question is treated differently. For vinyl, you unzip and peel back the siding, make the repair and re-install the siding. It is designed to be not water tight.

On a Hardie sided house, You basically have to re-side the home. There is no "remove and replace" to get access if there are issues. XSleeper gave a perfect example of damage to the corner channel. Also, with hardie, understand that it is not impervious to water problems. It doesn't like water infiltration caused by wicking either from a poor seal at what your j-channel would create or from splash if installed too close to grade. The material de-laminates and falls apart. Once that happens, there is no repair, it is only replace.

Just another reason it is imperative to follow hardie instructions to the letter. It is a very expensive product that can be finicky if not done correctly. And as XSleeper can attest , finicky even to the point of painting every cut edge prior to even installing the board on the house.
 

Last edited by czizzi; 08-20-15 at 04:39 AM.
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Old 08-23-15, 03:08 PM
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Over a hundred years of experience and no one gives the right answer.

"If you are worried about cuts you could place the trim over top with a nice miter cut. Or you can get recessed tin trim instead of the vinyl trim. Or skip the trim and do woven corners,but you need be even more precise"

There are plenty of option if done right. Following the instructions are good and have their place. But thinking outside the box is how innovation happens; making plank siding out of stucco cement is how Hardie plank came about.

Really what I was looking for were ideas from experts who have had done this for much longer than I, and I did find ideas but on my own in the frustration that the answers I was getting were rigid answers the same as those from sales or customer service people from hardware stores.
 
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Old 08-23-15, 03:58 PM
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Over a hundred years of experience and no one gives the right answer.
Or is it we don't give the answer you WANT?? The answers you were given here and most likely from the sales/customer service people was correct. Not sure where the quote came from at the beginning of post #10, maybe I missed it. But the advice you were given here was definitely different........and consistent.
 
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Old 08-25-15, 08:51 PM
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I guess you are right. The answer I wanted wasn't straight out of the manufacturer's install manual. I thought asking an expert I would get so ideas of other ways to do the trim. As an expert, one should have experienced with all sorts of situations and materials. One would then have ideas of how to do things in usual instances that require creative thinking. But hey what do I know about being an expert.

"If there's more to learn, then seek to learn it"
 
 

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