New Shed, Old Panneling for Siding

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Old 08-31-15, 09:48 AM
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New Shed, Old Panneling for Siding

I am rebuilding the clubhouse that I grew up playing in, and I'm going to use it as a storage shed. By coincidental timing, my parents are building a new garage next month, and I am taking all the 3/4" x 8" Douglas Fir ship-lap panneling that lined the interior of the 80+ yo garage that is getting replaced. I am planning on using it for the siding of the shed, and the interior panneling, but since it has been protected and dry for so long, I want to make sure I seal it really well to protect it. The problem is, this is going to be my first time finishing wood, other than using linseed oil for wooden tool handles and whatnot.

What would be the best product to use for sealing the panneling? Of course the first think that popped in my head was Thompson's, but I don't know if thats the best choice. I know there is also Behr, Sikkens, Sherwin-Williams, and a whole slew of others; so many options is what makes it confusing. I want something that will seal and protect it very well, but still allow the natural wood color.

What do you guys recommend? Thanks.
 
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Old 08-31-15, 10:10 AM
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A lot depends on what you want the finished product to look like. Some of that depends on what the wood currently looks like. If the wood is rough looking, I'd coat it with an oil base primer and top coat with latex house paint. If the wood cleans up nicely you can use siding stain [translucent/toner or semi-transparent] I would not use thompson's waterseal as it has a short life span!
 
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Old 08-31-15, 10:31 AM
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As stated, I would really like the end product to show the natural wood color. Obviously that depends on the condition of the wood (I'm going to start pulling the paneling this week and I'll post some pictures of what I'm working with when I can). It's rough finish paneling that I was planning on sanding to a nice finish, so I expect that will help remove any tarnished surface wood. From what I have researched, the recommended course of action would be to scrub the wood with a brush and Oxi-Clean solution, then use a power washer to rinse/blast off dirt and crud, and then let it dry for at least a week before sealing.

I know that Thompson requires resealing annually, that's why I was asking what the best translucent/semi-transparent sealer would be that would show off the natural color. In passing, I have heard good things about Sikkens Cetol 123 system, but I haven't been able to talk to anyone directly about it. If I have to use primer/paint I will, but my end goal is to have the wood grain showing.
 
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Old 08-31-15, 10:39 AM
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Before making any hard fast decision on the finish, get the wood cleaned up first. That way you can better determine what will work and what might not looks so good.

I've not used any Sikkens that I remember but it does have a great reputation. I can not recommend any completely clear finish for the exterior but the better brands of toner or translucent stains do hold up decent. Generally the more pigment a stain has the longer it will last. Cabot, B.Moore and SWP also have good exterior stains. I really like the look of Flood's CWF but it doesn't hold up great if exposed to a lot of sun and rain.

Another issue with thompson's is it provides little protection from the sun which allows the wood to bleach out and turn grey.
 
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Old 08-31-15, 10:44 AM
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Ok. Makes sense. We're not 100% sure that it is Douglas Fir, but a lot of the lumber used in the house and the garage is DF.
Is using Oxi-Clean and a power washer an ok method, or will getting the wood wet open up the possibility of warping and swelling? Should I plan on only sanding it to clean it up?
 
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Old 08-31-15, 10:54 AM
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It's hard to say without seeing the wood and it's current condition. On exterior siding and decks I normally wash with a bleach/water solution and rinse with a pressure washer. Sanding might be preferable but a lot depends on how much labor - one versus the other. It's best to wash wood while it's nailed up, either before you take it down or after you install it. Sanding is likely best accomplished while the wood is loose and on a saw horse. I'd be leery of pressure washing unsecured wood!
 
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Old 08-31-15, 11:20 AM
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Washing it before I take it down isn't really an option because it's the interior paneling, and they can't move all their stuff out of the old garage until the new one is built. My thought process was to take it down, sand it and then wash/power wash it to get a deeper clean, let it dry, and then give it at least two good layers of sealant on every side so that there aren't exposed edges.
Unless that's not the correct way to go about it....
I'm really exploring into new territory for my skills, so if there is a well established method that I should be using then it would make sense to follow those steps, but like I said, I don't think I can wash them before I pull them down without completely soaking everything in the garage. I'll check with my dad though and see what he says. I think they were planning on donating/throwing a bunch of stuff away anyway, so it might not matter if it gets wet.
 
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Old 08-31-15, 11:41 AM
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While old wood is less likely to warp than fresher cut wood, you never know what it will do when it gets wet. When the wood is securely attached to framing there is little likelihood of it warping. Personally I'd be leery of pressure washing it while it's down. Sanding might be enough. Usually if you are going to do both it's best to wash first, then sand after it dries. That prevents the sanding from forcing any grime or other contaminants into the wood.

I wouldn't be overly concerned about sealing all the edges. Generally if everything that is exposed is sealed - you won't have any issues. IF the bottom of the siding is close to the ground then back priming/staining those areas can be beneficial ..... but it's better [when feasible] for the siding to be high enough off of the ground for that not to be an issue.
 
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Old 08-31-15, 11:44 AM
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Ok, I'll see what I can do and check back. Thank you for the help so far.
 
 

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