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Beveled Cedar Clapboard Siding Help


poulin2000's Avatar
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MA

09-09-15, 03:57 PM   #1 (permalink)  
Beveled Cedar Clapboard Siding Help

Folks -

I'm replacing cedar clapboard on my house and the existing siding appears to be an uncommon dimension. The depth of the existing clapboard is 4" (rather 3.5") instead of the commonly found in my area 6" (rather 5.5") cedar clapboard.

Can anyone suggest how to deal with this situation without residing the entire house in 6" clapboard?

Has anyone else encountered this before? Do people just rip the common 6" down to 4" and bevel it? Can you just overlap the 6" more than the standard 1.5 to 2 inches to account for this?

Thanks for any help or advice.

 
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marksr's Avatar
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09-09-15, 04:13 PM   #2 (permalink)  
Welcome to the forums!

Siding sizes and profiles change over time. I suspect what you have was common in your area at one time but discontinued long ago. Generally the best you can do is find something similar - in your case modifying it to match.

pics might be helpful - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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09-09-15, 04:23 PM   #3 (permalink)  
If you are measuring the distance between each existing row of siding, that is called the "exposure". (The part of the siding that is exposed to the weather.) You can use 6" clapboard and have a 4" exposure. If your siding is a true 5 1/2" wide, you would want to keep your nails at least 1 5/8" high, so that each nail is just above the top edge of the last row. (Allows for expansion and contraction). If that seems too high, then yes you could rip it. But nail lightly, as the more you rip off the top edge, the fatter that side will get. (The fatter the gap the larger the void behind and that slightly increases the chance of splitting the siding when you nail.) Splitless nails help, not hitting thevsiding with your hammer helps too. (Use nail set)

 
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09-09-15, 04:57 PM   #4 (permalink)  
Thanks!

The exposure is 2.5" on my existing siding...it's 4" clapboard and not 6".

I can't find any 4" in my area. I suppose I'm going to have to rip some 6" and bevel it to match the existing siding unless anyone has a better idea....

 
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09-09-15, 06:44 PM   #5 (permalink)  
You will probably have to special order it from a mill in Canada or the Pacific NW. It will likely cost a small fortune but its certainly available.

Here is one source online... Western Red Cedar Siding - Issaquah Cedar & Lumber I'm sure you can find others. If you have a local yard they could order it in for you.

If you are residing the whole house, you could always change the exposure so as to use something commonly available.

 
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09-10-15, 09:40 AM   #6 (permalink)  
Thanks. I special ordered it from Sudbury Lumber local to me. They were able to find it unprimed...but considerably more expensive then the 1/2" x 6" format.

 
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09-10-15, 05:16 PM   #7 (permalink)  
Well just keep in mind that if you had used 6" siding you would have needed twice as many pieces in order to do the same sq ft... plus the labor of ripping it all down.

If you are lucky, your narrower siding will come in longer lengths and be of a better quality than the 6", with less knots. Smaller dimension lumber is generally like that.

 
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