Dry Rot Repair - Should I call a pro

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Old 10-13-15, 05:16 PM
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Dry Rot Repair - Should I call a pro

So basically I have dry rot that was from a previously neglected roof (previous owner) That has gotten bad enough to have gone past the siding and into the framing.
I have tried to get some guys in to get bids, but I am all over the map on this.
One guy is $65/hour per guy (he uses two guys) so $130 an hour, plus 20% ontop of materials. No bid since they don't know how extensive it is until they deconstruct it. Another guy is showing me a flat fee. Another is saying $40/hr per person.

I am not a carpenter and am fairly low on the knowledge scale when it comes to this stuff. I did build some deck stairs but dry rot scares me a bit.

Should I try to tackle this myself.. should I call a pro? What should I expect from a pro.. how do I pick one.
 
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Old 10-13-15, 06:03 PM
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No ones going to know what it's going to cost until someone opens things up to look. No one on any web site is going to know what your abilitys are, what tools you own.
Has the roof at least been redone?
For any help here or on any site where going to need pictures.
Once that walls opened up so we can see it someone here can get you through this step by step..
 
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Old 10-13-15, 06:06 PM
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You might ask your insurance agent if they have an estimator that might be able to look at it and come up with an estimated cost.
 
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Old 10-13-15, 06:07 PM
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We negotiated the roof with the sellers so it was redone with lots of sheeting replacement. I am a tad peeved at the roof company for not telling us about the rot. they simply sistered in a piece in order to hold the gutter.
I can throw up some pictures later.
 
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Old 10-13-15, 06:17 PM
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This might help. Assume a new roof is needed in that area. Also assume new wood will be needed and assume new siding, and framing in that portion is needed. Get a cost based in this scenario. That will be you high limit. Then pick the contractor who can do all that. But with the provision that only those items that actually need replacement be charged. Have them itemize the material and labor. Again have your insurance agent look at this and what would they allow for repair if this was covered under your home owners.

The original roofers did a bad job. You might have a case of poor workmanship via local codes and they might have to make the repair. I would contact the roofers, the Realtor and your lawyers about this.
 
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Old 10-13-15, 06:31 PM
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Norm... although the roofers were involved.... it sounds like the roof is ok and that the questionable area is the fascia board and what was or wasn't under it. They should have brought it the homeowners attention.


I might be tempted to open the wall in the room on the other side to make an inspection.


I had a similar problem. The fascia board was almost completely gone and the roofers "casually" refastened the gutter. It was several years until I happened to see daylight from the attic out.
 
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Old 10-13-15, 06:49 PM
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Pete, if that's true it sounds more like a handyman job rather than a contractor. I was trying to give the OP a starting point because he said the quotes were all over the place. Your idea of an inside inspection is good, but (correct me if I'm wrong) dry rot should not migrate like wet or water damage. Maybe a good thumping on the inside might reveal possible damage. Me thinks the OP is trying to keep cost and demo to a bear minimum.
 
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Old 10-13-15, 06:58 PM
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You are definitely correct.

Dry rot is a fungus that destroys wood in the presence of moisture.
The dry rot was more than likely caused by "moisture" from the gutter.

I'm thinking that at this point since the OP states that the dry rot has penetrated the framing.... pictures would be in order. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
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Old 10-14-15, 12:48 AM
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Here are some pictures
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Old 10-14-15, 01:16 AM
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Rotting yes and definitely caused by the water. You can see where the water was running down the siding.

That middle picture is interesting. It looks like that stud is short and may have insect issues.
 
 

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