Foundation skirting/treatment ideas

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  #1  
Old 10-13-15, 08:08 PM
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Foundation skirting/treatment ideas

Hi, Currently on my home I have a parging around the top of my foundation. it is a cement block foundation that has cracked in a little in the corners but all in all its still in really good condition. however, in a really bad storm I will get water in the cracks and ,subsequently, in the basement.

I am looking for ideas to skirt the entire foundation and seal it up.
I was looking at the faux masonary panels and possibly even fiber cement siding, but also thought maybe tin panels could work too as we frequently install them on shed sides all the time to near grade.

Thoughts anyone?
 
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Old 10-14-15, 03:56 AM
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Covering up the foundation with panels/siding is not the solution. You need to seal up the areas that leak. Touching up the stucco as needed might be enough. I'd be more concerned that the water infiltration is below grade.
 
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Old 10-14-15, 07:49 AM
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I agree 100%.
Metal panels will always rust out below grade.
Hardiee siding needs to be installed at least 2" above grade.
 
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Old 10-14-15, 06:39 PM
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The foundation has been dealt with. I dug it down, put a stick on membrane on then a corrugated membrane on top of that with sealed at the top. with the cracks being caulked.

no I didnt say anywhere about below grade applications. I do believe it was "frequently installed near grade" on buildings not unlike sheds. I am glad people only read what they want to in forums. ugh.

Back on Topic. If anyone has any helpful suggestions that would be great. Parging might seem to be the easiest but I want it sealed so less cracks form in the future.*






Annotation. Read at your own expense.
*given a basic knowledge of science, water, weather, and concrete I know how they form and how to prevent them. for purposes of expediting decent well thought out answers and not opinionated gibberish I Feel this need to be explained but not so much so that everyone needs to read it. I am as frustrated with no answers as I am un-answers from everyone on the net. This forum just happens to be where I am going to vent. so If you read all of this I'm sorry.
 
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Old 10-14-15, 07:00 PM
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Since your description is very difficult to get a good idea of the situation, a photo and sketch might make it easier to get the answer you desire. - After 5 years of engineering and 40 years of concrete, masonry, and basement experience, and being a PE in several states, I found it difficult to really understand the situation.

It is not unusual to see a post by a new-commer unfamiliar with construction terms.

Dick
 
  #6  
Old 10-15-15, 04:32 AM
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Masonry will always crack if there is any movement. Covering the masonry up won't prevent the cracks, just put them out of view. Unless the above grade cracks are major - it would be odd for them to allow enough wind driven rain in to make into the basement. Pics would help us better understand the situation - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

Repairing the stucco and then coating it with a primer and elastomeric paint will go a long ways toward preventing water infiltration.
 
 

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