siding nail set issue

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  #1  
Old 10-20-15, 06:37 PM
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siding nail set issue

I am about to re-paint my exterior part of home that is part brick and part siding. I want the wood to last long and it hasn't been painted for 7-8years. I can see paint is fading in Texas heat and nails are showing on siding.

my question:

I want to set my nail 1/4" in to the siding, most are not and then cover them with wood filer, sand if needed and then paint the home after power washing the wood. that way it will give a clean look.

I have purchased nail set like this one DEWALT 1/32 in., 2/32 in., 3/32 in. Bi-Material Nail Set (3-Piece)-DWHT58018 - The Home Depot that use with hammer to set the nail. But the nails refuse to set no matter how many times I hit the hammer. There are hundreds of nails. I dont mind doing it one by one with hammer if they would move. This home is 10 years old.

Is their Nail set gun available to make job allot cleaner and faster?

also for any rusty nails, to prevent future rust. I was going to use this, what you guys think: http://www.homedepot.com/p/KILZ-1-ga...atalogId=10053

need suggestion please.
 
  #2  
Old 10-20-15, 06:56 PM
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Is your siding fastened with ring shank siding nails like these: Name:  nail.jpg
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A nail set won't set these nails. They are driven flush with the surface of the siding and painted.
 
  #3  
Old 10-20-15, 07:03 PM
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my siding looks like this, too dark to take a pic. but I found this online. will take a pic in the morning. not sure about the nails. I got the house 4 years ago and it was built 10 years ago.



Thank you
 
  #4  
Old 10-20-15, 08:34 PM
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OK, another question...are you sure it's wood siding and not fiber cement, like hardiboard lap siding? Nails on fiber cement siding need to be snug to the siding but not below the surface.
 
  #5  
Old 10-20-15, 08:55 PM
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That siding in the picture looks like masonite.
 
  #6  
Old 10-21-15, 03:56 AM
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With most types of siding, including both types mentioned above, it violates the mfg's directions to set the nail below the surface.
 
  #7  
Old 10-21-15, 05:35 AM
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As noted above, sinking the nails will loose some of there holding power. Rusty nails are best replaced with galvanized nails but an oil base primer will help hold back the rust. Sometimes it's beneficial to countersink them and putty over them for a bigger barrier than primer and paint will provide.

Is the existing paint chalky? Latex paint doesn't adhere well to chalk! When it isn't feasible to wash it all off you need to either apply an oil base primer [exterior wood primer is better than Kilz] or add Flood's EmulsaBond to the first coat of latex.

I doubt any house built in the last 10 yrs would have masonite siding.
 
  #8  
Old 10-21-15, 10:05 AM
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alright. Here are some actual pic of what I am trying to paint to make it last and look nice. I think it is Fiber Cement. the picture I got above yesturday was from home depot page for Fiber Cement (James Hardie HardiePlank HZ10 5/16 in. x 8.25 in. x 144 in. Fiber Cement Select Cedarmill Lap Siding-215518 - The Home Depot). I am not entirely sure. hopefully you guys can tell from the pictures below what I have.

Now as you can see some nails are showing while others are kind of showing. I am not sure what type of nails they used, but if it is Fiber Cement, can you tell? I am not sure if the builders used cocking on nails or just painted after applying the nails. None of the nails are so far out for me to easy pull them out. The paint might be chulk. I can out my hand on an area and paint will come off on my hand like a chulk. not sure.


What do you guys suggest. power wash, use cocking around windows if needed, prime areas that need and paint? no need to mess with the nails, put wood filer or cocking on it? What about the rusty nail or nails that have not rusted yet, but are almost showing with paint still on them, should I use something on them? Few people suggested some products. Can you tell me what type of primer and If I need to prime the whole home again or just certain areas and what to do on nails. I want this job to last along time and look professional. nail set and using oil base seal on nails idea I got by looking stuff online. Paint wise I am gonna go with a similar color using paint sprayer I just got to give me a smooth look. Also how many coats you guys suggest. Texas heat can be hard on outdoor paint.


if yous need any more pictures or more info. please let me know. This is my first outdoor paint job.

last thing I wanted to ask is how long can these siding last before need replacement. maybe years down the line. I might replace them when needed with brick. What you guys think?




 

Last edited by kakashi; 10-21-15 at 10:26 AM.
  #9  
Old 10-21-15, 11:04 AM
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That looks like LP Smartside. 16' long pieces... 1/2" thick.
 
  #10  
Old 10-21-15, 01:29 PM
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I'm a painter, not a carpenter but I generally will add caulking to fill the holes left by the nails that were driven in too far. Just caulking the hole and not leaving any excess caulk around the nail hole. Glazing can also be used and is a little quicker/neater but I feel that caulking does a better lasting job.

The properly set nails just get painted over. Generally the siding doesn't need to be primed prior to a repaint but any rusty nail heads should be primed with an oil base rust inhibitive primer. Is the old paint chalky?
 
  #11  
Old 10-21-15, 01:53 PM
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Masksr,

I posted allot of detail two post above. sorry if I missed some things that were asked:

The paint might be chulk. I can put my hand over the siding and very little paint will come off on my hand like a chulk. not sure though.


If some one can answer all my question and direct me to proper path. trying to get this thing done this week before it starts to get cold in my area.

Thank you all
 
  #12  
Old 10-21-15, 01:56 PM
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CarbideTripped,

Let me know if you need some more info, like pulling a nail or something. I try answering the questions you had few post above with my siding pictures.

This is my project this week. waiting on some good replies guys.

Thank you

Here it is again:

alright. Here are some actual pic of what I am trying to paint to make it last and look nice. I think it is Fiber Cement. the picture I got above yesturday was from home depot page for Fiber Cement (James Hardie HardiePlank HZ10 5/16 in. x 8.25 in. x 144 in. Fiber Cement Select Cedarmill Lap Siding-215518 - The Home Depot). I am not entirely sure. hopefully you guys can tell from the pictures below what I have.

Now as you can see some nails are showing while others are kind of showing. I am not sure what type of nails they used, but if it is Fiber Cement, can you tell? I am not sure if the builders used cocking on nails or just painted after applying the nails. None of the nails are so far out for me to easy pull them out. The paint might be chulk. I can put my hand on an area and paint will come off on my hand like a chulk. not sure, what you think?.


What do you guys suggest. power wash, use cocking around windows if needed, prime areas that need and paint? no need to mess with the nails, put wood filer or cocking on it? What about the rusty nail or nails that have not rusted yet, but are almost showing with paint still on them, should I use something on them? Few people suggested some products. Can you tell me what type of primer and If I need to prime the whole home again or just certain areas and what to do on nails. I want this job to last along time and look professional. nail set and using oil base seal on nails idea I got by looking stuff online. Paint wise I am gonna go with a similar color using paint sprayer I just got to give me a smooth look. Also how many coats you guys suggest. Texas heat can be hard on outdoor paint.


if yous need any more pictures or more info. please let me know. This is my first outdoor paint job.

last thing I wanted to ask is how long can these siding last before need replacement. maybe years down the line. I might replace them when needed with brick. What you guys think?




 
  #13  
Old 10-21-15, 02:34 PM
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It's usually a good idea to wash the exterior before you repaint. I usually use a bleach/water solution for cleaning as it is both cheap and effective. I'll add TSP to the mix if there is a lot of chalk. It sounds like the chalking is minimal on your house. Chalk is the oxidized paint that will rub off of the siding onto your hand. It's often white or at least lighter in color than the actual paint on the house.
 
  #14  
Old 10-21-15, 06:39 PM
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Even if you can, I wouldn't try to set those nails below the surface. You're liable to split or crack the siding. Just hammer the protruding heads flush. As far as filling with wood putty, I never had much luck with wood filler on exterior surfaces. It's very likely to pop out after a few seasons especially over a steel nail head. What I see in the pics is wood grained siding that has been nailed. It's a uniform pattern, it is what it is, I would live with the look.
 
  #15  
Old 10-22-15, 04:09 AM
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I never had much luck with wood filler on exterior surfaces. It's very likely to pop out after a few seasons especially over a steel nail head.
The main reason I prefer to use caulk to fill the sunken nail heads is I believe it stays in place better than putty or any other wood filler. IMO it's easier to get a nice looking fill job with putty but it can fail whereas caulk is more apt to stay put. You do need to use care to remove excess caulk from around the nail so you don't make it look worse than before you started.
 
 

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