Starter strip under Hardie plank over windows & doors

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Old 11-17-15, 08:18 PM
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Starter strip under Hardie plank over windows & doors

Hello,

What do you use for a starter strip over windows and doors? Over my windows and doors I need to rip the plank to half its normal height. That means the 5/16" plank material is too thick to rip to use for a starter strip. So what do you use?

In my first encounter with installing plank over a door, I figured I need about a 3/16" thick starter strip to keep the angle of the plank consistent.
I thought about using PVC, but the thinnest I could find is 1/4" and I don't have a planer or jointer to take it down.

And, while we're talking about starter strips over windows and doors, do you leave some gaps for drainage? That's what Hardie recommends for the starter strips at the base of the wall, but I don't want to invite the wasps and yellow jackets over for an easy access, comfy, home.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 11-17-15, 09:05 PM
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You need to rip something on a table saw to the appropriate thickness. Treated wood, pvc, really doesn't matter too much. The thickness depends on the width of the plank remaining, as you have surmised.

Over a window (or window trim), there should always be a drip cap. For years I have made an upturned end dam on these drip caps, after hearing that it is code in Canada to do so. They recommend a 1" upturn at drip cap ends, then the siding is notched as needed so it can be slipped down over the end dam. A 1/4" space is left between the siding and any horizontal flashing for drainage.

IMO a 1" upturn is a bit extreme. (I like 1/2" or so) But the idea is good. It prevents water on top of the drip cap from running off the ends and behind the siding.

Wasps and such can't get in when there are upturns on the drip cap ends and when the starter fits between them with maybe 1/8" to spare on each side.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 11-17-15 at 09:21 PM.
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Old 11-18-15, 11:02 AM
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Thanks XSleeper.

You touched on something I was thinking of as a follow-on question regarding the drip-cap. For my windows (and maybe my doors), I'm using a PVC drip-cap (Azek, Certainteed, and probably others make them). I'm also using Certa-flash around the windows. Do I need aluminum flashing too? I think it would look wrong if it were under or over the PVC drip-cap.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 11-18-15, 11:51 AM
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Yes, you still use a metal drip cap over the top of it. If your pvc drip cap has a lip in back, you would probably want to apply the starter to the wall, then apply the metal drip cap.
 
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Old 11-18-15, 07:39 PM
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Thanks again XSleeper.

I stacked up some trim pieces and took a couple pictures to see if I'm understanding you correctly.

Here's a profile of how the pieces might go together; aluminum drip-cap over brick mould and PVC drip-cap over the aluminum drip-cap:
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I bent up the aluminum drip-cap in a fashion like what you described. I have to admit though, I'm not loving the idea of slitting the planks to accommodate that up tab.
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The aluminum cap between the brick mould and the PVC might work OK. Both the brick mould and the aluminum cap are 1 1/4" deep. It won't work very well above the windows though, because the trim is only 1" (5/4) deep.

Also, I'm wondering how to best adhere the PVC to the aluminum cap. I certainly don't want to nail through the aluminum.
 
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Old 11-18-15, 09:09 PM
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I'm not even going to comment on putting the flashing under the drip cap.

When doing something non-standard, like using the pvc drip cap, you would probably need to bend your own custom flashing... which goes on TOP of the drip cap. You are probably expecting to buy something off the shelf and make it work, as most homeowners would. Sadly, that's just not going to happen.

Personally, I think that if you don't have access to some trim coil and a metal break, you should omit the pvc drip cap. And in your mock up, maybe you know that you still need to cut (what was previously the downward bend) off the face of your flap. The flap as pictured is also way too long to suit me. After the siding gets notched and slipped down over the flap, you need to caulk the siding where it goes around the flap.
 
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Old 11-19-15, 10:51 AM
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XSleeper, as I said
I think it would look wrong if it were under or over the PVC drip-cap.
I was just trying to visualize what you had in mind. Over the PVC looked even more wrong.
That style of drip cap was used on all the original windows of my house. I'm only replacing around half of the windows and I'm trying to have some semblance of a uniform look.
Gaining access to a brake is a challenge. A local materials distributor has one for customer use, but they'll only deal with contractors.
I had to pay a premium to get a custom bend from a metal shop for my over-the-band-board Z-flash.
If I had a brake or a way to fashion a metal flashing over the PVC drip cap, what would it look like (an L or a difficult "skin" over the PVC)?

Thanks again.
 
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Old 11-19-15, 11:09 AM
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or over
???

Old style window trim with the drip cap simply had an L over the drip cap. It was often nailed to the drip cap with short nails every couple inches but if you had the right tension on the bend, nails would be unnecessary, especially if you put a litile sealant under it. If you could find a roll or sheet of lead flashing, that would work and would be very diy friendly.

http://www.amazon.com/Sheet-Lead-64-...R7V6VMTS8QP06Y

The lip on the back of your drip cap will be a problem, unless you either buzz it off on a table saw before you cover it with flashing... or use your starter strip to build the wall out a little before you add the metal flashing.
 
 

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