Question on cedar siding

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-16-16, 02:28 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question on cedar siding

Hate to jump on forum and ask a question but have to make a decision in the next 4 hours. Long story short. Guy in town bought a house that has cedar what he called beveled planks on it. The wood seems to be in good shape, but previous owner did not keep it up. Very weathered. 2800 square foot of it. He said i could have it for free on two conditions. That i remove it all and that i take it all. So questions how tough is it to take the siding off, if it is tongue and groove can i do it without breaking tongues. Can i get it back to looking pretty good to use on my lake cabin. Powerwashing, sanding, re staining and sealing. Any help would be great. I have to let him know tonight because i was first to answer but 15 people behind me are chomping at the bit. Thanks again
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-16-16, 02:34 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,216
Received 721 Votes on 667 Posts
Does he mean dutch lap? Beveled cedar would mean lap siding... clapboards. There is also v-groove siding, (car siding).

Can't really say if you can take it off and save the tongue... depends how careful you are and how weathered it is. Paint can glue the bottoms pretty good sometimes, and if it was ever caulked horizontally, forget it. You generally just need to be very careful about prying the nails loose. It will be pretty time consuming and you will need a lot of scaffold to do it. This isn't something you can do off a single ladder. You will probably also split at least 25% of it, no matter how careful you are.
 
  #3  
Old 05-16-16, 02:43 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the input. He said it was beveled but when I went out there was no lapping. To me it looks like tongue and groove. Felt the bottom board and to me felt like a groove. Has been caulked or sealed between the end of each run and the corner trim piece. Would a nail remover make taking the nails out easier?
 
  #4  
Old 05-16-16, 02:46 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,587
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
Since I don't like the maintenance which goes along with cedar siding, I'd pass.

That said, I might consider it for the fire pit....
 
  #5  
Old 05-16-16, 02:55 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,216
Received 721 Votes on 667 Posts
The vertical caulking is no big deal. A nail remover or cats paw, will destroy the siding. If it is nailed near the bottom you will want to start removing the nails- starting on the very bottom row- by carefully prying behind the siding with a flat bar. A reciprocating saw with a metal blade would be helpful, as you could cut the nails off from below once you have opened some space up for the blade. Then the siding should fall right out of the groove above. And then work your way up... Cutting the nails off from behind is your best bet if you want to save the most siding damage free.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: