bulging aluminum on fascia board

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Old 08-09-16, 06:35 AM
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Question bulging aluminum on fascia board

Problem: We had our raised deck screened in. The installer (now long gone) covered the end beam (12" x 20' fascia board) with a sheet of aluminum siding... too tightly. Since that end of the deck faces southwest, it is exposed to the hot sun, and the aluminum bulges. The top and bottom edges of the aluminum are tucked under other work (the screen frame and trim).
What is the best way to eliminate the bulging? Remove the trim nails and....? Remove the aluminum and paint the facia board? Reinstall the aluminum, but tack loosely? Replace with.....? Cover with...? Other?
Many thanks.
 
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Old 08-09-16, 09:15 AM
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Buckling is a common problem with aluminum trim especially when there are large flat sections. The best way to 100% get rid of the issue is to remove it and paint the wood underneath. The trim can be re-done but it's still difficult to get rid of buckling. It's just the nature of the beast and it's not completely the aluminum's fault as your wood deck also expands and contracts.

For large sections of aluminum trim there is a special punch tool (also used for punching vinyl siding) that punches a slot in the metal. This allows you to leave the fasteners slightly loose and provides room for the material to expand and contract without binding on the fasteners and buckling.
 
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Old 08-09-16, 09:50 AM
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Hard to give a suggestion sight unseen. Post pictures if you can.
 
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Old 08-09-16, 02:20 PM
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Very much appreciate your insight and quick reply. It will be a bit of a task to ease the aluminum off without damaging the overlapping trim of the screen framing. But, I sense that your advice is the way to go. Guess I just have to resign myself to the idea of having to paint every few years; with a good quality paint, it should not be a problem. Thanks, again.
 
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Old 08-09-16, 05:00 PM
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Before you go ripping everything off... do you know what's underneath? Will it look good painted?
 
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Old 08-22-16, 07:38 AM
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yes, I know exactly what is underneath. (The deck has been there for years, and I had painted the fascia board a few years ago, before deciding to have the screening installed. The contractor that installed the screening above the deck inspected the joists and prior construction the ensure that it was all sound and strong enough to support the screen framing. But, why he chose to put the aluminum trim on the fascia, I don't know. I guess he felt he was saving me the work of having to paint not only the screen frames but also the fascia).
Now, I have to share that I think I've discovered something that seems to me a much better solution than replacing the aluminum or painting: Home Depot sells sheets of pvc trimboard, about 1/8 or 1/4 inch thick x about 12 inches wide, 8 feet long. It's far more expensive than painting, of course, but it seems to me that once it's installed it is maintenance free. Gotta see if the piggy bank is willing to share some spare coinage.
 
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Old 08-22-16, 07:49 AM
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The PVC boards are expensive but they are good. Just be aware that PVC also expands and contracts a lot. I have used it in shorter sections with great success.
 
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Old 08-22-16, 07:50 AM
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The new PVC trim boards look very nice and are low maintenance. They do expand and contract with temperature so care has to be taken during installation to leave room for this or they too can buckle.

Most of them cannot or should not be painted dark colors as this can cause them to overheat. If white is what you want you are all set. Most of the installation problems come from not allowing room for expansion at joints or seams, so make sure you follow the installation instructions regarding spacing and caulking joints.
 
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