Stucco by front door letting water in. Reseal?

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Old 02-02-17, 11:23 AM
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Stucco by front door letting water in. Reseal?

First time homeowner. Just outside the front door is a big concrete rectangle. When it rains hard, water pools on the concrete. After a big storm recently I noticed that I was getting bubbling on the paint just on the inside wall. I think that water is seeping in from cracks in the stucco. It seems like the interface between the stucco and the concrete was sealed at one point. At this point I am mostly concerned about not letting more water in. I would appreciate any advice on the existing paint bubbling as well. Please take a look at the pictures and let me know what you recommend. Thanks!

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...E5MDJmYWNTeFNR
 
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Old 02-02-17, 12:09 PM
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Welcome to the forums Bob!

Is it just rain water coming from the sky or is there some running off of the roof or across from the patio? Ideally you'd stop most of the water from pooling.

Caulk will probably seal the cracks but by itself may not be a permanent fix.
 
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Old 02-02-17, 12:17 PM
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Exactly.

You're going to need to raise the patio blocks near the house and then refill the joints.
Caulk will not stop the water from getting in.

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Old 02-02-17, 12:42 PM
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I see a couple problems.

The slab and pavers on the outside are at the same grade as the floor inside. This is ALWAYS a bad idea, as water can easily puddle and run inside, under a door threshold or especially through the rough opening along the sides of the door. I don't see any slope on the pad outside... you generally want 1" of drop per foot for the first 10' to get water away from the perimeter of the house. So IMO if you have puddles, that entire corner- pad and pavers- needs to be demoed and regraded... then when it is replaced, the pad should be LOWERED... (not raised). The pad should be at least 1" lower than the concrete floor inside.

Secondly, it looks like the pad was poured in front of the stucco with no flashing, and no weep screed. Any moisture behind the stucco needs to drain. I see no drainage plain. Another reason to remove the pad and pavers.

Finally, the damage extends up onto the wall inside. This tells me that either the water from the floor is being sucked up the drywall, or the leak is coming in higher than you think. I would remove the baseboard and door trim and cut out a section of drywall 1' high and see what exactly is wet inside the wall. Drywall is easy to repair and it's important you figure out if the moisture is wicking up from the floor or if it is wet inside the wall / on the exterior sheathing.
 
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Old 02-02-17, 01:02 PM
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Didn't realize that was a concrete pad. Definitely not going to be able to relevel that.
 
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Old 02-02-17, 01:32 PM
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@Markersr,
It seems to just be rainwater coming from the sky but there is also some dripping onto the concrete from the roof as well. We don't have any gutters as it is a pretty flat roof and with the current courtyard, there isn't anywhere put the water if we did get gutters. This puddling only seems to be a problem during a big rainstorm and since this is Los Angeles county, it doesn't happen that often but it has been unusually wet this year.

@XSleeper,
It is plaster on the inside rather than drywall, but I think it is all coming in from the ground rather than from above because only the bottom area has bubbling. We plan on redoing the courtyard when our budget affords it. The courtyard has other drainage problems one of which is that the water on the other side of the courtyard can only drain through the garage. I think the entire courtyard will need to be regraded. One problem is that there is a big carrotwood tree in the center of the courtyard which seems to have raised up the center over the years. To really regrade the courtyard we would probably have to get rid of the tree?

Back to the immediate concern which is wet walls, would caulking the bottom edge offer temporary relief until we do the big courtyard remodel? My friend's handyman said to use silicone caulk... It seems like they have sealed it before from the pictures but I am not sure with what. Any ideas? I would like a quick fix first if possible. Appreciate any advice on this.

Also, when we do decide to redo the courtyard, what kind of worker should we call? General handyman or landscaper, or general contractor? Thanks again!


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Old 02-02-17, 02:38 PM
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Absolutely do not use silicone. Use a polyurethane sealant like Vulkem or Quad or NP1 or Loctite SL10.

Call a landscaper. They can build a retaining wall ring around the tree.
 
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