Builder thinks this is normal, I am very worried

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Old 02-22-18, 10:40 AM
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Builder thinks this is normal, I am very worried

Question regarding rainwater entering new home build. Our builder has recently started dry walling our new home and I walked into this scene yesterday morning and was in shock with seeing water penetrate the drywall. Look at the water puddles around the bottom of the dry wall, the exterior is leaking across the whole side of the room. Is this normal to have this issue, our builder said this is normal which I find hard to believe. The home will soon be bricked but currently only has the insulated sheathing right now. I would have thought the insulated sheathing would have prevented this issue and I would have thought the builder would have waited for the studs to dry out before adding the dry wall but I guessed wrong.

Please share your thoughts..
 
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Old 02-22-18, 10:44 AM
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While not normal it does happen. Most builders wait until the exterior is dried in before hanging drywall. Never seen them hang drywall before the roof is shingled. May not be an issue with brick but if siding is hung after the drywall - nail pops often result.

almost forgot welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 02-22-18, 11:20 AM
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It's difficult to see from your photos, but if the drywall has wicked up a significant amount of water, then I would personally insist that the bottom course of drywall is removed immediately and replaced only after the siding is installed. Removing it now will help identify the source of the leak and will minimize the growth of mold. At the very least, sweep up all the dirt and sawdust off the floor and dry everything out with a fan. And why on earth are they installing sheetrock when the roofing hasn't been completed and windows haven't even been installed?!
 
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Old 02-22-18, 11:50 AM
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I agree with Mark - this may be normal but your builder's order of doing things is not.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 03:11 PM
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Guys, the picture were not taken at the same time. Notice the exterior roof picture with shingles staged and waiting installation, you can still see open studs inside the building, so the roof was installed before the drywall.

Lack of gutters probably has some excess splash on the outside. Moisture like this I don't find overly problematic unless it is excessive. It may very well just be the slab wicking water as the brick has not been installed as of yet.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 03:16 PM
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Good catch Z
I was focusing on the unshingled roof and didn't even notice the windows weren't in like they were in the first pic
 
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Old 02-22-18, 03:31 PM
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Houses under construction are going to have a few leaks. It is not surprising. The pictures at various stages don't help.

We would need to see what the outside looks like NOW... not what it looked like a few weeks or months ago.

The water is likely coming in under the plates. No gutters, there will be splash back from water coming off the roof and hitting the ground when it rains. If siding isn't on, the wall to roof flashing is incomplete and might leak. Drywall too close to the floor will wick up water that comes in under the wall.

Could also be ice on the studs or frost that was on the sheathing prior to drywall that is now melting if the house is now being heated.

IMO it's nothing to cause concern, just another normal day on a wintertime job site or after a rain.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 04:02 PM
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Czizzi's post not withstanding. Yes the roof is on, but are the windows installed? I can't quite make that out

FWIW...It may be normal, but if it was my money on a new build, I would not want drywall installed before all openings were enclosed and weather tight. At the very least wait until dry or fair weather is the normal forecast rather than snow or rain. Not saying it can't happen and nothing is perfect but some of that drywall is touching water and it don't take much to ruin drywall and promote mold.

All that being said I agree it's probably not enough to worry about. After a few week if the drywall affected feels soft have the builders replace it. I'm sure they won't have a problem.
 
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Old 02-22-18, 04:46 PM
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And you have to assume that there is not a final grade on the lot!
 
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Old 02-23-18, 02:57 AM
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Yes the roof is on, but are the windows installed? I can't quite make that out
Norm if you look at the pic of the drywall in the bath rm you'll see the window is installed. They generally install all the windows at the same time.
 
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Old 02-23-18, 02:13 PM
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FWIW...Today I met a friend of mine who is a retired professional wall boarder. I asked him about this type of situation. He assured me it's perfectly normal. He then went on to tell me stories where water actually rose up onto new wallboard. If not disturbed and allowed to dry out it's perfectly good.

However, he also told me that he worked for some contractors who would only allow wallboard to be put up after is acclimated for several days in the house and if it was cold, he would use heaters to bring the temp up to home normal living temperature if heat was not running in the house.

So my concern is unfounded as is the OP's.
 
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Old 02-23-18, 02:18 PM
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Around here in the wintertime, in houses that are under construction if you have a wall that is exposed... no drywall yet, just fiberglass with kraft facing... and you are running propane heaters to keep the place halfway bearable, (because its below zero outside) you will get icy frost on the inside of the wall sheathing. (Propane heat puts off tons of moisture into the air).

And it can be a LOT of frost. You wouldnt even know its thete unless you peeked behind the fiberglass. So then when the drywall gets put on, that process of frost forming on the sheathing stops of course, but the frost is still there. Then you get a warm day and all that frost and ice that is inside the wall suddenly melts and makes mysterious puddles all along the floors. It freaks you out if you don't know where it's coming from.
 
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Old 02-25-18, 09:20 PM
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Thank you for your help. The builder has agreed to remove the bottom course of drywall to let dry, and then replace with new drywall.
 
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