Help removing window on shed before replacing siding

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Old 06-28-18, 07:02 PM
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Question Help removing window on shed before replacing siding

I need to replace siding on my shed but when I'm trying to remove window, the metal edges are caulked so hard I can't pry it loose. I've tried to cut through it close to the frame but I'm afraid of ruining the window as I will use it again once the siding is replaced.

I am not a dyi'er and I don't have a clue what I'm doing. My husband built this shed right before he died and the siding has rotted all around the bottom with some pieces rotted up in the middle as well. I feel pretty confident I can remove the siding, and I know someone who is willing to cut the hole for the windows but I'm loss as to how to go about removing siding from window or window from siding. If I don't need to completely remove window, then how do I install new siding around it where the "flange" will be flush?

Thanks for any advice you can offer. Living on a budget...
 
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Old 06-29-18, 04:45 AM
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In normal building construction, the windows are installed after the rough siding goes on and before the finish siding goes on so if you are only replacing the finish siding, you don't have to remove the window. If there is wood trim around the window, it could have been installed on the rough or finish siding.. If installed on the finish siding, it needs to be removed before the finish siding is removed and replaced after the finish siding is installed. If there isn't an aluminum drip edge at the top of the window, attach one there to the rough siding before installing the finish siding. Caulk the seam where the drip edge and finish siding meet. Good luck.
 
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Old 06-29-18, 05:08 AM
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Please post some photos so we can better understand what you are dealing with.
 
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Old 06-29-18, 10:03 AM
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beelzebob: I have the framework and then the siding, nothing else. Is that what you mean? It is attached to the outer siding and it was never trimmed. I'm pretty sure according to your post, that I will need to remove the window. However, I'm not sure what you mean by the drip edge.

Wirepuller 38: Attaching pics to show
 
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Old 06-29-18, 10:16 AM
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I'm not sure I would remove the old siding. What will the new siding be? To remove and save the window you will likely need to cut the old sealant with an oscillating multi-tool. (Like Fein multimaster).
 
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Old 06-29-18, 10:56 AM
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You are right. I was thinking 2 layers of siding. I can see from your pic there is only 1 layer of siding and it is attached to the wall frame. If the pic shows the window in question, it does not need to be removed to replace the siding. It is attached to the wall frame. However the pic needs some more clarification. I see only vertical seams in the siding which means there is a continuous sheet from the bump out (near bottom of roof line) to the ground. If this vertical dimension is more than 8 feet, your options become limited and the cost increase because most wood sheathing comes in 4 foot by 8 foot sheets. Do toy have replacement siding in mind? Horizontal seams in sheathing that are butted is a disaster waiting to happen due to water penetration. Please provide us with the vertical dimension and then maybe I can provide some options.
 
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Old 06-29-18, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
I'm not sure I would remove the old siding. What will the new siding be? To remove and save the window you will likely need to cut the old sealant with an oscillating multi-tool. (Like Fein multimaster).
XSleeper: I believe the new siding is cedar lap or the equivalent. Is there a way to lay new siding over the old without having to add new eaves as well?
 
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Old 06-29-18, 11:07 AM
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The sheets run vertical and are 8X4 excluding the portion under the eave. I circled to show where the top of current siding begins under the portion under the eaves. (sorry I have no clue what anything is called) I can take a different picture if needed.
 
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Old 06-29-18, 05:41 PM
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I suggest you look at t1-11 plywood sheets ( for external use). It can be purchased in 4x8 sheets. I would paint both sides and all edges before installing. The side facing out when installed has grooves along the 8 foot side and texturing that creates a pleasant look. Groove spacing is different between manufacturers so at least get enough from the same manufacturer to do both gable end walls. The side facing in is flat. The gable ends (walls with the inverted V) present a challenge. You will have to remove the nails in the upper sheathing in the overlap area to remove the lower sheathing. If this leaves the upper sheathing in good condition, you don’t need to replace it. After the lower T1-11 sheathing is slid under the upper piece, the upper piece can be renailed (after caulking the overlap area) to the frame in the overlap area. If you have to replace the upper piece with the T1-11, you will need to shim all of the upper frame so it is flush with lower piece of T1-11. You will also have to add studs to the upper part of the gable ends if the ends of the T1-11 don’t fall on an existing stud when the grooves between upper and lower pieces are aligned. It looks like they should. Caulk all the vertical seams with clear silicone caulk. Any lumber yard can show you what drip edge is and how to install, You will have to measure the distance from the wall frame to the outer edge of the window to get the correct fit. Good luck.
 
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Old 06-29-18, 06:09 PM
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The following confuses me. What is the sheathing?

"You will have to remove the nails in the upper sheathing in the overlap area to remove the lower sheathing. If this leaves the upper sheathing in good condition, you donít need to replace it."

Sorry to be dense, but truly this is all completely new to me.
 
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Old 06-29-18, 08:16 PM
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Your old t1-11 siding is what he is calling sheathing, because it is probably the only thing that is covering the outside of the walls. It is acting as both sheathing (gives structural stability to the walls) and as siding (whereas siding is just for looks). Your old t1-11 is probably doing both. Not so much on looks though.


Is there a way to lay new siding over the old without having to add new eaves as well?
Yes. If your old siding is still fairly flat and is the only sheathing on the walls you should be able to leave it. You have a lot if damage on the bottom edges though. That could be cut off and replaced with plywood or osb that is the same thickness as the existing t1-11 siding. Before your new siding goes on you would want to install housewrap ( a wrb... water resistive barrier) over the old siding. It's main purpose is to protect the building from water damage if any water happens to leak behind the siding, or around the windows.

To do it properly, your windows really should come out, because they are normally placed on top of the wrb... but as you mentioned, this is a shed... so you sometimes can cut a few corners to save on labor and materials.

If you were to leave the windows, (and i would)... I would suggest that after you put some housewrap on the building, you trim the perimeter of the windows with 1x4. (Or 5/4 x 4 which is a little thicker.) A z-flashing would cover the top trim. You would caulk the perimeter of the window to the trim, and leave the screws exposed. Then your siding would butt up to the window trim. Same thing on the corners. LP makes some nice 5/4 x 4 premade corner trim, and I would suggest you put that on your corners. All trim goes on top of the housewrap, just like your siding does.

And if you will be putting lap siding on, LP Smartside is pretty decent stuff and not too expensive. You don't have to do anything to the upper gable end siding that lays on top of the lower sheets... you can go right over it. IMO, no reason to take it off at all. (Except for the rotten stuff as mentioned earlier).
 
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Old 06-29-18, 08:42 PM
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XSleeper: Thank you for your response. A few questions:

*The trim at corners go on top of siding, correct? The last step of all the installation?

*Verifying that if I place new siding on top of old I would not need to do a new gable as well? (Sorry I was calling it an eave.) I definitely do not want to have to do a new gable and the existing one is in very good condition.

*Do I need to do anything to waterproof the exposed top edge of the new siding where it would normally be caulked against the gable if I don't do a new gable?
 
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Old 06-29-18, 08:59 PM
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No. If you are doing horizontal lap siding, you put trim, (including your outside corners) on top of the housewrap. The siding is cut to fit between the trim, then you caulk the edges. Putting it on top is the crappy California "production" method. In other words some people do it that way for speed, not quality. I guess it does give bugs a place to live if you do it that way.

So you are saying you don't want to replace the gable siding (the triangle part)?

I suppose you could leave it if you could pull or cut the nails along the bottom edge of the gable siding and slip a metal z-flashing behind the upper siding / over the lower siding. You use flashing to make sure no water gets behind the lower siding... not just caulk.
 
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