Front step drains into siding

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-01-18, 06:49 AM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Front step drains into siding

I just bought a new home, and water is getting into one corner of the house. The drywall on the inside of the pictured corner is soft and there was mold under the baseboard, but no water marks are visible from the inside. The bad drywall only extends about 6 inches up from the floor. Our realtor said the previous owners poured a new step at the front entrance, and thought it was likely that the step was trapping water against the trim, and water was wicking up into the interior of the wall.

Question 1: What should I check to find out if this really is the source of the water?

This is the outside wall: The affected drywall is inside the corner with the gutter and along the wall by the step. I see no evidence that the gutter or downspout are leaking.

When it rains, water pools in the slot by the step.

A closer view: As you can see, the trim extends several inches below the step. The siding is LP (circa 1990, so not good stuff), but the trim is wood. The trim appears undamaged.

Question 2: If this is the source of the water, how can stop water from infiltrating into the house?

One suggestion I've gotten is to cut the trim above the step and install metal flashing. I'm not sure what I should expect to find behind the trim, nor where/how to attach the flashing. The house foundation probably extends some distance up behind the trim, but I would also expect there to be some form of vapor barrier back there which I would rather not damage. What can be done to enable proper drainage of the slot next to the step?

Location is the Seattle area, so lots of low intensity rain and dampness. The house was built in 1990, and it is in good shape but the build quality isn't the highest.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-01-18, 07:01 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,027
Received 679 Votes on 628 Posts
You say water IS getting in. Then you say it WAS getting in. Then you say there are no water marks on the inside. But that the bad drywall is 6" up.

Now that we are thoroughly confused, which is it?

Judging by the way the corner board has been hacked into pieces and replaced with new rough cedar I would say that the siding may have been repaired there recently. Since the step is new it was pribably all fixed before you bought the house. So all that would seem to be taken care of.

If it is still wet inside then yes you have a problem. If not, then they just didn't repair the drywall or baseboard inside.

Clarification would help.

Plus if you want other ideas of where water might come from we need a picture from farther back showing the roof.
 
  #3  
Old 09-01-18, 10:46 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 59,231
Received 1,119 Votes on 1,039 Posts
I'm not the pro in this forum but that certainly looks like trouble.
In the bottom picture..... that "wood" behind the lower step is going to rot.
Is there a basement in the house and is it below there ?
 
  #4  
Old 09-01-18, 02:06 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
XSleeper, thanks for your response. Regarding the water, it has been a very dry summer so there is no wetness in the drywall or the wall right now. We bought the house this summer, so we haven't seen it in the rainy season yet. The previous owner was unaware of the drywall damage since it wasn't visible, so I doubt they fixed it. But, perhaps the problem was older than the step and the previous-previous owner fixed it. I guess we might have to see what happens this winter to have a better idea.

There weren't any water spots or anything visible. We only noticed the drywall damage when we went to replace the baseboards and found that section was soft and had mold behind the baseboards. So, the soft drywall extends 6" up, but nothing was visible. Now that you've pointed the contradiction out, that makes me think that it's been painted over since the damage, which fits with your idea that someone fixed the problem but not the drywall.

Here are a couple of pictures of the roof area:


As you can see, the roof design that funnels all the water to the front door isn't the greatest, and the previous owner rigged that board there rather than fixing the leaky gutter opposite from the wall with the bad drywall.

Pjmax, Yeah, I worry that board is going to rot out eventually. There isn't a basement, just a crawlspace and it does extend over there. I don't think it goes under the steps though.
 
  #5  
Old 09-01-18, 03:08 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,033
Received 234 Votes on 209 Posts
I think you have multiple problems, The roof water needs to be redirected. Perhaps better pitch of the gutters and maybe a dam is needed. A second down spout may help. And get that board out of there and see what really happens when water is flowing down the roof. I'm betting the steps are not pitched properly or have settled towards the house and redirecting water at the house.

I would not want to wait and see what happens. Now that the climate is warm and dry I would open up the area and find out for sure what's what. On the inside take out the soft drywall and let the exposed area dry out. Then replace after you solve the cause of the water issue.

Personally I don't believe the previous owner did not know about the issue. Most likely he tried to hide it.
 
  #6  
Old 09-01-18, 03:19 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,027
Received 679 Votes on 628 Posts
The siding in that corner near the bottom appears to be brand new... the corner has bee repaired... the concrete is brand new, so its obviously been repaired.

What they didn't do... fixing the gutters should be a priority, and deflectors should be added to that area where the valleys end to prevent water from splashing over the top of the gutter. Your new gutters could be 6" k-style instead of 5"... should have 3x4 downspouts, not the 2x3 ones you currently have. They will move 2x the volume. Keeping the gutters clean will also be very important... another reason why the damage occurred in the first place, (overflowing gutters) necessitating the siding repair and new concrete.

The way the roof was built and the way the step was done are not ideal, but at this point I would recommend you get yourself a tube of Loctite S20 self leveling concrete crack filler... and a 12" long piece of clear 1/2" poly tubing. Cut and poke the tube, then put the poly tubing over the tip of the caulking nozzle. Try to fill the crack where the concrete meets the trim, but go easy on it... if there is much slope on the step it will all come running out the front.

The bottom edge of the siding where it meets the trim has not been done according to the mfg directions, but I suppose they were trying to do what they can to keep the water out, so that is what it is. And btw, caulking the horizontal gaps underneath lap siding is never recommended.
 
  #7  
Old 09-01-18, 07:25 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks! I'll work on the gutters and getting some dams up there. Then I'll move on to the concrete. The tip about the Loctite S20 should help. I really appreciate your insights for this!
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: