Repair of T1-11 siding

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Old 10-23-18, 08:23 AM
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Repair of T1-11 siding

Have a question about the best method of repairing the siding on my workshop. I have a detached workshop which was built in 2003. The exterior siding is T1-11 which was installed directly over the studs with no insulation or vapor barrier. The bottom of the siding has sustained water damage over the years and is delaminating/crumbling for about 6 to 8 inches from the bottom. My question is, other than replacing entire sheets of the siding, what is the best way to repair this damage? I have seen online some examples of using a band, or cutting away the old T1-11 and replacing it with the same material with z-channel etc.

I am sure some of you guys have experience with this type of repair. Can you guide me to some videos etc or give me detailed instructions on how to do this repair. Thanks for any suggestions or comments.
 
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Old 10-23-18, 08:58 AM
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How high does the damage extend? That pretty much determines what you would use to make the repair. To cut the siding you'd screw a straightedge to the siding, set the depth of your skilsaw to match the siding and cut. The flashing gets shoved up under the remaining siding and over whatever you use below.
 
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Old 10-23-18, 10:08 AM
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As mentioned above, the damage goes up the siding about 6 to 8 inches. So if I cut that 8 inches off, could I use something like hardi-plank and nail it directly to the studs without putting anything else behind it? If I use hardi-plank would I still need to use the flashing to protect the bottom of the existing siding or would caulking seal it up?
 
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Old 10-23-18, 01:12 PM
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I missed where you said 6'-8"
You still need to slide the flashing up under the T-111 and over whatever you use at the bottom. Hardi-plank would be a good choice as it should last a lot longer than the T-111 did.
 
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Old 12-01-18, 11:50 AM
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Sure, you can cut off the bottom install a z strip and new piece at the bottom. I have also screwed the patch panel of top of the original, then cut through both layers at a 45 degree angle. Done right this will yield a piece which fits up under the original with caulk to seal it.
But I would not recommend either of these measures. It costs about $40 a sheet for T1-11 (or less for the paper-type) and makes for a better, long lasting job to replace the entire sheet.
 
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Old 12-01-18, 01:37 PM
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Rip the siding to fit a 1x10 piece of Expanded PVC trim. You will need to get some "Z" flashing. You tuck the flashing up under the existing siding after your cut and then install the 1x10. You will never have to repair that section again. The only potential issue is hat T1-11 is 5/8" thick and the 1x10 is 3/4" thick. In the past, we have stuffed a ripped down roofing shingle behind the T1-11 to fill it out. I believe that the "Z" flashing is also set for 3/4" material.
 
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Old 12-02-18, 04:56 AM
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I'd replace that section with PVC lumber not T-111 or Hardie!
With PVC lumber there's no more painting (it can be painted if you wanted to) easy to cut, never going to rot.
Hardie has to painted, it's to thin for what your doing, a royal pain to cut without breaking or chipping, should never be installed within 2" of grade, far harder to nail.
 
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Old 12-02-18, 06:06 AM
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I like what czizzi suggest with a caveat.

How about routing a joint into the expanded PVC.

He was saying how the PVC was 1/8" thicker, the t1-11 being 5/8 and the PVC being 3/4"
Requiring a shingle spacer behind the t1-11 to shim it out to match the PVC thickness.
That sounds pretty good and it would be fine in my opinion.
What may be even better consideration, if you have a router, you could mill down the joining edge with the router to create a step in the PVC and then slide the step up under the t1-11 prior to securing it in place. This could also be done with a table saw for that matter.

A lap joint, a little schmere of calking and yer done.
 
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Old 12-02-18, 11:20 AM
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Excellent Idea, but the "Z" flashing is set for 3/4" material, so notching will do nothing. Have performed this repaid dozens of times. it works, will solve your problem.
 
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Old 12-03-18, 06:43 AM
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One thing I'd do is after cutting the T1-11 apply paint/stain to the bottom of the cut edge before installing the Z flashing.
 
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Old 12-08-18, 09:11 PM
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Lowes carries a 19/32 Plytanium (T111) with a limited lifetime warranty. As others have stated, cut out the old. Paint the cut edge. Install Z trim leaving it at least 1/4" below the upper panel. Cut and install the lower panel. It would be a good idea to paint the lower edge of the new panel also. The PVC board is also a good choice and would not worry about an 1/8" difference between the two as the Z trim will cover the difference.

Typically the T111 or Hardie are not recommended to be installed within 6" of the ground.

You could also do the repair the install vinyl siding over the whole shed.
 
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Old 12-12-18, 02:11 PM
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Thanks for all the suggestions guys. I think you talked me out of the hardie plank idea. The PVC sounds like a good idea because I don't want to replace it again anytime soon. I think I have plenty of room at the bottom to cut out the bad stuff and use the PVC board. The upper part of the T1-11 is still in excellent condition so I don't want to replace all of it. Unfortunately, the bottom is damaged almost all the way around the building so I would have to replace every sheet of T1-11 if I went that route. As soon as the weather will co-operate I will take a closer look. One more question - How much trouble is it to get the z-flashing underneath the T1-11? I guess it will depend somewhat on where the nails are that hold the original siding in place. If you have any tips or suggestions for installing the z-flashing let me know. Thanks.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 03:29 AM
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It shouldn't be too big of a deal. After you've cut off the bottom you can slip a pry bar under the siding and peel the bottom out enough to slip in the Z flashing. If you are unlucky you'll have a few nails to deal with.
 
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Old 12-13-18, 06:46 PM
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If you encounter the occasional nail that prevents you from installing the "z" flashing, use a set of tin snips to remove some of the flashing to clear the obstruction.
 
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Old 09-03-19, 01:09 PM
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This is an old thread I started last year. A multitude of things happened to prevent me from making this repair to this date. Hopefully when the weather cools off I will actually be able to start on this project. I was talking with a friend about this project and told him I was planning to use PVC board for the repair. He brought up something I had not previously thought much about. One side of the workshop in question is exposed to the hot afternoon sun here in Northeast Georgia. If I use the PVC board as a skirt, what effect will the hot sun have on the board as far as expansion and contraction? The building is 24 feet long so I will need to use three 8-foot boards along the bottom to span the distance. Will the joints expand and contract much due to the temps, and how should I compensate for this expansion and contraction? Also should I use butt joints or some kind of overlapping joints? Any suggestions appreciated.
 
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