lousy cedar on gable

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Old 04-28-19, 03:03 PM
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lousy cedar on gable

Gable end of my house cedar is looking pretty bad. Built in 1984, it was natural for a number of years, then stained and then again. In addition to peeling, there are some cracked boards. They don't leak but there might be bugs as evidenced by woody woodpecker whacking a dozen holes in the last year. I've caulked and painted over the holes but something has to be done.

Ideally, it would be ripped off, and OSB installed (there is only foam board behind the cedar). Vinyl shakes would be nice but more expensive that I want to go.

I'm thinking of leaving the cedar in place and putting fir strips on 2' center to install 4x8 sheets of a product similar to T-111. Lowes has a product that looks like barn siding which looks nicer. It has more water resistant surface than T-111, which will take a coat of paint and look nice.

Here is a link to it:
https://www.lowes.com/search?searchTerm=15601

The only caveat is that it is not recommended for residential. I have this product installed in my office wall and a few cut off pieces were left outside in the weather completely exposed. One is part of an arbor to protect air conditioner from the hot sun.

It was never painted and fully exposed to rain, snow, etc. It has held up for five years. The reason for non residential is that it is not structural like T-111, Given that the existing cedar would be under it, I don't think I need to worry about structural integrity. I would plan to prime and paint before use. It would also be protected by the gable eave so rain would no pour down it from the top.

The window (see picture) is flush with the cedar so, I'll need to trim around it with Azek or something, caulk and make a sloped sill.

Given the uneven of the surface (cedar lap boards), I'd go with 1x3 firing strips instead of 1x2 to give it a little more rigidity.

What are your thoughts? Would there be a better way of installing this product.
 
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Old 04-28-19, 03:09 PM
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Well, your link takes me to a Kidcraft step stool, so I don't know that I would mount that on top of your siding, no. LOL
 
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Old 04-28-19, 03:17 PM
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Trying again. If this link doesn't work, go to lowe.com and search product # 15601

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Brown-Engin...875-in/3051241
 
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Old 04-28-19, 04:02 PM
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I don't know why Lowe's site would say that product is for non-residential unless it is not the same exact product that LP makes. Here are LP's directions, which say nothing about a residential-use restriction. https://lpcorp.com/media/1300/lp-unp...ns-english.pdf

That being said, I don't know why you would want to leave the cedar in place, you gain nothing from leaving it there. Cedar clapboard is not structural either, fyi. The instructions clearly say you can either apply the knotty panels over sheathing or directly to studs where your local building code permits it.

Leaving the cedar on and furring the wall out even farther builds everything out beyond your window trim, and creates an additional void for bugs. (Woodpeckers love both the bugs and that hollow sound)

The correct thing to do is to first of all check with your building dept if required in your area. That will tell you how to proceed, none of us can possibly be aware of what they may or may not require. Generally gable ends can be left unbraced and unsheathed. My opinion is that you should remove your cedar (to reduce the thickness around your window trim) apply a minimum of 7/16" osb sheathing, (not for structural reasons) then apply a wrb (housewrap, which is required under all types of siding) then apply the siding of your choice.
 
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