Would you cut these siding shingles? How?

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Old 06-19-19, 02:30 PM
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Would you cut these siding shingles? How?

The roofer put on a new roof last year. He said he was going to cut back the wall shingles so there'd be a gap between them and the roof - I think the roof shingles get wet and the siding just soaks it up. Can't be good for the siding or the house, right? He never did that / he didn't do a bunch of things he said he was going to do... I don't want him back.

Would you cut those siding shingles back? How would you do it without hurting the flashing behind it?

I envision a dremel type tool. Or is there something like a circular saw that you can control how far the blade sticks out? I'll get a measure of the thickness of the siding and then cut a fraction if an inch less than that, and hopefully the shingle will snap on that cut line?

THANKS!
 
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Old 06-19-19, 04:12 PM
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He is right that the siding is too tight, but no I would not cut them... can't tell for sure what the siding is. (Kind of looks like Masonite / fiberboard). But there is no way to cut it without damaging the flashing behind. Someday down the road those pieces should be removed if possible and replaced.
 
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Old 06-20-19, 01:36 AM
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Correct me if Im wrong, but shouldn't the flashing from under the siding be on top of the shingles?
 
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Old 06-20-19, 03:55 AM
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Yeah, your wrong. It's only on top of the shingles on the top row if that top row buts up to a wall. And even then it's sometimes covered up with a row as a beauty cap.
 
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Old 06-20-19, 05:38 AM
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The siding was installed wrong, not the shingles.
It never should have been that close to the shingles.
I agree that looks like the old Masonite that long ago there was a recall on because of all the rotting issue with it.
This is more like what it should have looked like if done right.
https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/...f&action=click
 
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Old 06-20-19, 06:07 AM
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I thought it is a more natural product - 'cedar shakes' ? but much smoother surface than a house I was growing up at with unpainted cedar shakes that were much more grainy.

Here's a close up of another part of the house. I can see a faint grain under the paint.

And previous owners had an addition put on the house. That builder cut back the existing shingles correctly / like joe's picture.

With the potential change in what you thought the siding was made from - still woudln't cut them back with a dremel tool or similar? Just deal with it / spray to kill mold and deal with it when replacing roof in 15 - 20 years? That picture with the vent / worse of the 2 pics, of course, is on the north side of the house so it's in shade all the time... perfect conditions for siding too close to the damp roof.
 
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