Which insulation behind T1-11?

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Old 03-21-20, 12:04 PM
J
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Question Which insulation behind T1-11?

I'm 100% new to home improvement, so I bought a house that needs EVERYTHING repaired!

I have help with this portion but was hoping for more advice. My home is half T1-11 and half...tile siding.... The tile on the front is fine, so I'm not touching it. The sides and majority of the back is T1-11. The tile portion on the back is damaged, bowed, and missing. I've removed some of the tile to see what's behind it. Felt and rot. There was some type of wood sheathing, but it's dead. Contractor's plan is to replace the tile with T1-11. We'll be removing all the sheathing behind the tile, and assuming the rot did not do more damage, replace the felt and add new T1-11.

My question in in regards to the insulation. What I see so far is yellow and deteriorating. What do you recommend I replace it with? The pink FG? Paper in or out? Staples or friction fit?

Thanks in advance! SO MUCH.
 
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Old 03-21-20, 12:15 PM
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Fiberglass doesn't really deteriorate... its glass. It might get wet, dirty or moldy, especially if your wall was getting wet and/or rotten. That would be the only reason to replace it.

The color of fiberglass insulation really doesn't matter. Pink is just Owen's Corning's color. Use whatever you like. Kraft facing could be used but typically you install it from the inside and staple it. You cant staple it from the outside. But the kraft facing should be toward the inside, unless you live along the southern coast. Filling out your profile would help us to know what state you are in, since that often makes a difference.

Besides fiberglass, you also could consider rockwool or denim insulation. They are a little harder to find. And of course, there are a variety of R-values when it comes to insulation. For a 2x4 wal you might find r-11, r-13 or r-15 insulation. More r value is obviously better. But you dont cram R19 insulation meant for a 2x6 wall into a 2x4 wall. It doesn't work that way. Insulation must be loose, it loses r value if it is compressed.

And Kraft facing is not a must, its optional. Vapor retarders can also be part of your air barrier inside... meaning the paint on your drywall is also a vapor retarder.
 
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Old 03-23-20, 05:04 PM
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XSleeper -

Thanks so much for the thorough response! After posting this question, I discovered I need to gut the kitchen and bathroom, the two rooms on the other side of this wall. So, I'll just put the insulation in from the inside like a normal person. The insulation and the entire situation is....interesting.

I'll fill out the profile too. Thanks! (I'm in North Carolina, on the coast.)

If you're curious: https://www.instagram.com/sunflowerscottage/
 
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Old 03-23-20, 06:05 PM
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Sounds good. You're discovering the joys of remodelling!
 
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