How To Replace a Few Fiber Cement Siding Panels?

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Old 05-07-20, 06:47 AM
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How To Replace a Few Fiber Cement Siding Panels?

I'm an OLD retired building contractor who just bought a small 14-year-old home to downsize my life. It has cedar trim and fiber cement siding, likely HardiPlank with a 5" exposure. I've worked with all kinds of siding but never fiber cement. I have 4 panels halfway up one wall that have failed from water damage. Can someone tell me the best way to remove these panels? I will follow the manufacturer's installation instructions to replace the bad panels. But I don't want to screw up the wall removing the bad panels. Any guidance would be appreciated. Thanks! Vic
 
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Old 05-07-20, 07:03 AM
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Fiber cement is blind nailed at the top of each row. So in order to get a piece off without damaging the one above it, you need to rip a piece of siding in half lengthwise, just below the lap. You would do this on your highest damaged piece. Once you have cut through it, you still need to remove the portion that has been nailed. What I do is gently pry behind it at the nail just to make a little space. Then I use a Fein Multimaster with a bimetal blade to cut the nails flush with the sheathing. Once they are all cut, that piece drops out.

You may need to repair the WRB if you cut into it. When you replace the siding, the last row will have to be face nailed. If you dont want it to be face nailed, you will have to take siding off all the way to the top, so that the top row will be face nailed.

To cut fiber cement, they make a special blade, a 4 tooth carbide. If you cut any wood with it, it will take the teeth right off. You can use a cheap demo blade in a skilsaw if you only have a few cuts to make.

And you would need to figure out why its water damaged in the first place or it will happen again. No kickout flashing at the end of a roof is the primary reason something like that might happen.
 
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Old 05-07-20, 07:29 AM
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XSleeper,

You are correct. The problem stems from the fact there is no diverter flashing on an adjacent roof. I will handle that. I fully understand your advice. I will face nail the top course since I donít want to remove the 8í of panels above the bad area. One final question: do you recommend using a nailer or a hammer? Thanks for your help. Thereís nothing like learning from the experience of others before diving into something youíve never done before. Vic
 
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Old 05-07-20, 08:49 AM
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I'd rent a siding nailer.

If you want to hand nail it, I'd predrill with a small masonry bit then use 7d hot dipped galvanized. With the siding nailer you can get ring shank. Some places will sell them by the coil.
 
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Old 05-09-20, 08:20 AM
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XSleeper,

I've got a couple of nailers, so I'm all set. Thanks for your advice. You've made the job easy.

Vic
 
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Old 05-09-20, 08:25 AM
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Thanks Vic. I'm sure you will have no problem working with it.
 
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