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Stop Leak? How do I seal T1-11 Siding at baseboard to concrete front porch

Stop Leak? How do I seal T1-11 Siding at baseboard to concrete front porch

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  #1  
Old 05-22-20, 02:19 PM
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Lightbulb Stop Leak? How do I seal T1-11 Siding at baseboard to concrete front porch

I saw other threads, but I can't find just what I think I'm supposed to do. I have 40+ year old house and T1-11 siding. There is a base board or whatever it is called at the bottom where it meets the concrete front porch and stairs. There is caulk there (or was) but of course it wears away. In addition, the water leaks into the blocks behind the porch and floods the crawlspace and house.

I don't know of any flashing that was ever put there.

I would like to finally fix this. Do I use flashing? What I don't know is how to put it there. Even if I saw off part of the siding, how do I keep water from going up under the flashing into the blocks again where the flashing will rest on the concrete?

In addition, there is no roof over the porch, and the water puddles bad. I wanted to slope it with tile or the like, but then I'm back to where I was because when I get to the house with the tile, I don't know what is supposed to be there. I want rid of the caulk if I can.

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  #2  
Old 05-22-20, 03:06 PM
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I have 40+ year old house
And the siding and base is original?

If so then despite the bad conditions Id say your doing pretty good. If the wood is solid what about just digging out the old caulk and using a good outdoor brand like Quad or Solar to seal it good!
 
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Old 05-22-20, 03:20 PM
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Well unfortunately there is no way to do it without caulk. Unless you have some magic wand I dont know about. You have multiple problems there, and there is no easy fix.

First is removing your base trim. If you want to avoid damaging the siding above you will need to cut all that caulk out. Personally, I would use a multitool for that, like a Fein Multimaster. Once the caulk is cut, rip off the base trim, I wouldn't bother saving it.

Then you would address the concrete pad, which you say is flat with no slope. It looks to me like it may have already been repaired once, unless that damage in front of the door is from using salt / deicer in the winter. But other than completely tearing out the concrete pad and pouring new, the only option is to apply a sand/topping mix to the pad, putting more in back, less in front to create your slope. 1/4" of slope per foot is needed if you don't want puddles. So if that porch is 4 feet wide you would add maybe 1 1/4" in back and only 1/4" in front. In addition, you may as well cut out the top row of brick, replace it and fix the steps.

Once the topping is done, you would add a wall flashing to the wall-concrete joint. The best thing to use there would be copper. You can buy it in small rolls and easily bend it on a metal brake, which you can rent. I would probably bend pieces that are 8 to 10 feet long... it should go up the wall about 3" and extend out onto the concrete 1 1/2" or so. You would take a urethane concrete sealant like NP1 and lay a healthy bead along the edges of your new pad... (after its cured, of course) then place the copper flashing over it... nailing it to the wall as you press it down tight to the pad. This will serve two purposes... it covers up the sealant and makes a water tight seal at the same time.

Then you need to put some z-flashing behind your 4" OC groove 303 siding. To do that you need to pry the bottom edges loose with a prybar. If there are nails on the bottom edge, you can cut them behind the siding with the multitool and a bi-metal blade made for that sort of thing. Once its loose and nails are cut you can slip a z-flashing up under the siding. Normally you dont caulk the top of the z-flashing to the siding but in your case I think that would look best. If this was new construction or if you were completely replacing the siding, you would leave a 1/4" gap between the siding and the z-flashing.

Then lastly, you would replace the trim. It goes under the front lip of the z- flashing and lays over the top of the copper wall flashing. It's critical that the concrete topping be nice and true or you will pull your hair out cutting that trim piece if the concrete is tapered or wavy. Your copper flashing will be very straight once you bend it, so the concrete needs to be straight as an arrow where the flashing will sit. If it fits nice, there is no need to caulk the bottom edge. If the gap is wide or crooked, you would caulk it for appearance sake before painting it.

To help with spreading your topping mix, I would probably cut myself a shim... 1 1/4" on one end and 1/4" on the other. (Or 1 1/2 to 1/2") And use that as a guide as I filled in the topping mix on top of the pad... doing 16" or so, then moving the shim back and fill in another 16" or so... just to get it as close as possible. You would fill that in as quickly as possible, then you'd use a large Frisco type of float and extension poles to smooth it all out. The larger the float, the flatter you will be able to get the surface. This will be nearly impossible for 1 guy to do working alone as you will need someone mixing and bringing you topping mix as fast as you can spread it.

There are also other sorts of topping mix that are for topping that is a maximum of 1/2" thick down to a feather edge, but that would mean only 1/8" of slope per ft and they also dry very quickly so they are harder to work with. (Bonded topping mix)

And I won't get into detail about the way you would prepare the pad for topping mix (grinding and powerwashing) or how to best bond your topping mix (slurry scratch coat and liquid additives). But those are my initial thoughts.
 
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Old 05-22-20, 04:24 PM
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Thanks.
I'm not sure I understand on the topping. Where does the "mix" which I think is the new mix to bond to tile or just be more concrete, touch the end at? Does the mix go all the way to the copper flashing or is that the shim part and a bead of caulk?

Edit: I looked up topping mix. I don't know where it should end at the copper or flashing and how (caulk?).
 
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Old 05-22-20, 04:26 PM
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You put topping mix "on top" of your old concrete.
 
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