Cutting back siding that touches shingles

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Old 06-02-20, 09:43 AM
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Cutting back siding that touches shingles

We had 2 layers of shingles 30 years old - likely 3 tab? The painted cedar shingles were touching the old roof. The north facing side of hous where the shingles / siding touch has more pealing / algae? on the siding.

The 'pro' that did our rip off and new architectural shingle roof said he was going to cut back the siding but didn't (he ripped off more than the roof).

Interesting - the 1 layer of architectural shingles touches the siding / they got the shhingles under the siding.

The house is getting painted soon. I started manually cutting back the siding and wanted (yeah, after the fact) to get your thoughts / advice for doing the rest of it.

In this section in the pictures, I cut it about 1" off the roof. I used a utility knife / standard blade and tried to judge depth / not cut into the step flashing. But can't be sure since the cut is right behind the bottom of the siding and only 1" off the roof, can't get a good view.

1) Is doing this and maybe hurting / cutting through the flashing in some spots potentially making the situation worse (holes in the step flashing, 1" off the roof vs. water wicking into the siding?

2) how would you cut back the siding? It's painted cedar. I was thinking a dremel tool with a small cutting disk might work? I don't have 1 of those / never used one. Or some sort of a mini circular saw set to the thickness of the cedar? Does that exist?

3) Would it be feasible / needed for a novice DIYer to be able to slip new step flashing over the existing flashing to potentially protect that 1" cut?

4) how's cutting it back 1"? I was seeing some things on the web talking about 1 1/2" .... or more!?

5) there seems to be some sort of caulk? (or gunk?) on the shingles where the old siding was touching. Just leave it alone?

anything else?

THANKS!

 
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Old 06-02-20, 10:32 AM
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The flashing exposure looks more than 1". The flashing will stick out, even with painting the flashing the same color of the siding. By the way, your before and after pictures are the same picture.
 
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Old 06-02-20, 12:38 PM
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Damn, sorry about that double picture mistake! as for the 1" - it's 1" - 1 1/4" at most? (with the ruler held vertical, not perpendicular with the roof slope).

Interesting you can figure that measurement from some crap pictures I post : ) But that's why I am here - people way more experienced than me !

the flashing will stick out - visually is what you mean, right?! Don't want flashing sticking out physically.

You say that (that it will stick out). but that's just what it is, right? unavoidable? you really want the gap between siding and roof for function / protect the siding / increase life of paint job?
 
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Old 06-02-20, 03:30 PM
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I meant stick out visually, not physically
 
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Old 06-02-20, 05:00 PM
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First, you arent going to cut through sheet metal step flashing with a utility knife. So dont worry about that. If its aluminum flashing, you might cut through that.

1" would be the bare minimum it should be above the roof. No, I would not bother putting more step flashing under there. There's likely nothing wrong with what is there. And if you try to put more under you are likely to break your siding up and cause more problems than good. The step flashing also needs to be under the felt paper that is under the siding, and you can really only do that when the siding gets replaced.

As for how straight your cut is, I would have laid a long 1" thick board on the roof and then used that board as a guide for my oscillating cutoff saw blade. You guarantee its straight that way. You just have to be very careful not to push too hard and cut the flashing. You can cut 95% of the way through the siding and then score the last little bit with your sharp knife. If you are cautious, you can hear, feel and see when the oscillating tool is almost through the wood. Definitely stop pushing if you cut through. A wood blade wont cut the step flashing as long as you arent pushing hard.

Once it's all cut off, take some cardboard up there to lay down and protect the roof while you prime and paint the newly cut ends of your siding.
 
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Old 06-03-20, 12:35 PM
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Xsleeper especially - thank you for all the time you spend here helping me and others! Not sure if I am doing things wrong, but I barely have time to post questions, let alone answer as many as you do ; )

'
'likely nothing wrong with the flashing' - likely, but I might have cut through (it's aluminum).

oscillating cutoff saw blade!?

like this:

https://www.harborfreight.com/oscill...ool-62866.html

or this one?

https://www.harborfreight.com/1-38-i...eth-61819.html

with https://www.harborfreight.com/3-12-i...ade-61817.html

?

I've heard of these tools. Never used one. There's no depth control on these are there? Or on more expensive ones?

And using a piece of wood!? Nice! I'll try that. What height above would you use? a 2x4 would be 1 1/2" high, right? (never used these oscillating units before - I'd rest the saw on the top of the 2x4? or you have to hold the saw above the 2x4 (would the oscilating part touch the 2x4 and move around too much?).

the onese at home depot start at $80+. that $20 harbor unit will do what I need? 75' of siding?

And I'm thinking - I'd put tape on the blade to mark the depth? the 2nd blade I mention above has measurements, but when it's moving you can't see that, right?

I'll redo that 1 stretch to that I already did to the higher height you recommend to make it straighter!

With the right tools you can do anything! : )


 
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Old 06-03-20, 05:15 PM
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Yes, that saw would work. I would stick with 1". Two pieces of 1/2" plywood. Or one piece of 1/2" and one piece of 3/4" if you need to go 1 1/4" to straighten out your cut. I would try not to go 1 1/2". You let the blade rest on the plywood and just hold the tool level and let it do the work. You dont really need to push hard on it, especially on cedar shingles... and especially not when you are trying not to cut the flashing behind it. No they dont have depth gauges. Yes, you can use tape on the blade... like white electrical tape.

Glad to help, and yes, if the wife asks just tell her I said you needed that tool. LOL
 
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Old 06-04-20, 03:54 PM
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THANKS AGAIN!!!

Key question I'm stuck on now - what type of blade? The one with the teeth along the front in a straight line:

harborfreight.com/1-38-in-high-carbon-steel-multi-tool-plunge-blade-61816.html

Or the one that's curved:

https://www.harborfreight.com/3-12-i...ade-61817.html

Keepiing in mind I haven't used this type of tool before (but will be playing with scraps before getting on the roof with it...

So the straight one with measurements helps control the depth. But to cut a line 20' long with that - do you tilt blade side to side and move the tool parallel to the roofline (and tilted, the measurement isn't useful). Or make repeated plunge cuts? 20' long of siding to cut, with 1" cuts each plunge, that's like weedwacking a lawn?

Or with the curved one, from vidoes online, that seems more geared for moving along to cut a long line? I'd think they could put concentric circles on the blade as a guide for depth, but they're not on the blades I saw at the store.

And not 1 1/2?! That's too high!? I can't find the pages I saw previously, but I thought I was seeing 1 1/2 - 2"?

I know an addition to our house, before we bought it has a sizable gap for siding above the roof shingles. about 2" visually noticable but I thought functionally better?

 
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Old 06-04-20, 03:56 PM
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Straight. You can better control your depth with it. You can also slide a straight blade along back and forth. Nothing says you have to do it 1" at a time. And you can feel when you have cut through. If you get the round one I guarantee you will either cut through your flashing... or dull your blade before you get 3 feet, or both.

Your old flashing may not go up the wall very far. That's why I would stick with 1". Generally wider is better as far as the siding is concerned. It just doesnt look good from the ground to see that much flashing so people dont usually do it.

A new house, with new siding and metric shingles which use wider pieces of step flashing would be a different story.
 
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Old 06-04-20, 04:50 PM
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As always, totally value your opinion!

Just to be clear - i talk of cutting the shingles 1" at a time because that's (about) the width of the blade. plunge, withdraw, plunge.

you say you can move the blade right / left? you mean actually cutting right / left (with the sides of the blade??

I was thinking since there's no teeth on the sides/ you are maybe cutting the shingles as you move to the left / right only because the side edge is beating into the siding / it tears its way through the siding? You want to angle the blade so the teeth are cutting into the fresh siding to the right or left? Or being that it's oscillating, the teeth, even with blade straight into material, are cutting to the sides (I would think a tiny bit only)?
 
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Old 06-04-20, 04:57 PM
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You will figure this out when you do it. Then you will understand why I said it.
 
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Old 06-05-20, 08:53 AM
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Old 06-07-20, 10:29 PM
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THANKS EVERYONE! I am still working on it but the oscillating tool with the flat bade is working great!
 
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